Kw-logo-smaller

Lyonesse #2:: Darksolstice Book Review

Lyonesse #2:: Darksolstice Book Review - Reviewed by Kidzworld on Mar 25, 2010
( Rating: 4 Star Rating)

To regain his throne, Idris Limpet must travel to the dangerous land of Aegypt to rescue his sister and prove his worth as a King. Check out Kidzworld’s book review of Lyonesse #2: Darksolstice by Sam Llewellyn.

Title: Lyonesse: Darksolstice Author: Sam Llewellyn
Ages: 10+
Rating: 4


In order to regain his throne, young Idris Limpet must travel to the distant and dangerous land of Aegypt to rescue his beloved sister and prove his worth as a King. Check out Kidzworld’s book review of Lyonesse #2: Darksolstice by Sam Llewellyn.


Well Between the Worlds Summary

In Lyonesse: Well Between the Worlds, Idris Limpet was taken from his home and trained to become a monstergroom—a person who captures and tames the monsters that live beneath the wells. In no time, Idris’s life was transformed. One minute he was an ordinary boy. The next he was the rightful King of Lyonesse.


An Act of Courage

But he doesn’t have control of his kingdom. The evil half-monster, half-woman known as Fisheagle is ruling over Lyonesse. Idris plans to conquer her, but he can’t do it alone. The other kings won’t fight by his side until he proves that he is a worthy warrior. To test his bravery, Idris must travel the long and dangerous journey to the feared land of Aegypt. There he must rescue his sister, Morgan, who is being held prisoner.


Knights of the Round Table

The journey is so dangerous that Idris has no chance of making it there alive. Luckily he meets a group of young bandits who pledge their allegiance to him. He doesn’t treat them as servants or subjects like other kings would. Instead Idris treats them like friends.


The Bottom Line

The Lyonesse series twists the tale King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table with young adult fantasy fiction. Sam Llewellyn created a fantastical world filled with freaky creatures, and a strong, courageous main character. We thought Lyonesse: Darksolstice was a great read. Tell us what you think about this book in the comments section below!


Related Stories:

  • Lyonesse: Well Between the Worlds Book Review
  • The Chestnut King Book Review
  • The Keys to the Kingdom: Superior Saturday Book Review
  • King Arthur's Court

  • >
    >

    readers voted!

    Comments

    there are 0 comments

    Please login or register to add comments


    like this article?
    Sign up now to get more just like!

    latest videos

    Shrek_140x100_w

    Coolest Magic Kingdom? Vote!

    • Far Far Away! Especially if Shrek is King!
    • Disneyland rules.
    • The Mushroom Kingdom is the best!
    • Far Far Away, but only if Prince Charming becomes King!

    related stories

    It's humans versus monsters in Lyonesse: The Well Between the Worlds by Sam Llewellyn.
    Micro_winter micro
    Winter solstice is the first day of winter. Check out all the celebrations that take place on the...
    Micro_summer-micro
    Summer solstice is the first day of summer. It's also the longest day of the year. That doesn't m...

    Random in the forums

    AlphaT
    AlphaT posted in Debating:
    "Teh_Skittlez" wrote: "AlphaT" wrote: "Teh_Skittlez" wrote: I should have known using the confederacy as an example would resonate with you. Like you said, it's another topic, but I could also talk about the Pacific slave trade.  I'm not pro slave, but I am against the south=racist bandwagon. I know you're smart enough to not be on that wagon though. Objection: Relevance? How is Pacific Slave Trade significant to the topic? It affected men and women alike (albeit mostly men)? It's not particularly relevant, it's another topic, that's why I'm not going to talk about it.  Oh. Okay.
    reply 6 minutes
    Teh_Skittlez
    Teh_Skittlez posted in Debating:
    "AlphaT" wrote: "Teh_Skittlez" wrote: I should have known using the confederacy as an example would resonate with you. Like you said, it's another topic, but I could also talk about the Pacific slave trade.  I'm not pro slave, but I am against the south=racist bandwagon. I know you're smart enough to not be on that wagon though. Objection: Relevance? How is Pacific Slave Trade significant to the topic? It affected men and women alike (albeit mostly men)? It's not particularly relevant, it's another topic, that's why I'm not going to talk about it. 
    reply 7 minutes
    AlphaT
    AlphaT posted in Debating:
    "Teh_Skittlez" wrote:I should have known using the confederacy as an example would resonate with you. Like you said, it's another topic, but I could also talk about the Pacific slave trade.  I'm not pro slave, but I am against the south=racist bandwagon. I know you're smart enough to not be on that wagon though. Objection: Relevance? How is Pacific Slave Trade significant to the topic?
    reply 12 minutes
    Teh_Skittlez
    Teh_Skittlez posted in Debating:
    "AlphaT" wrote: "Teh_Skittlez" wrote: "AlphaT" wrote: "Teh_Skittlez" wrote: "AlphaT" wrote: "Teh_Skittlez" wrote: Right, I'm obligated to sign up for the draft, and you couldn't even if you wanted to. Then again, women couldn't own and manage land while married until 1718....and it wasn't national until around 1850. You should probably specify where, because the place where I live wasn't even colonized yet in 1718.  Providence of Pennsylvania. However most states didn't accept it until around 1840-50. Maryland had achieved statehood in 1788, but it took them until 1841 to legalize married women to own property, and even them they had no control over the property. This is the case for many states. Face it, early America treated women as property....she was right on that part. But that's all changed. I'm not denying it. I was merely suggesting that you should specify where. Of course, in all the dates you've listed so far, men were also to be bought and sold as property in the U.S. in the states that would become the Confederacy. I would say that their treatment as property was much harsher than that of women in many cases, but yes, of course both men and women have been treated as property by the law in the past, and still are in many places today.    American Slavery didn't discriminate between genders. And for women, it was the same for blacks and whites. Also, pinning slavery and the confederacy together? I thought you knew more about the topic. But that's another debate. I should have known using the confederacy as an example would resonate with you. Like you said, it's another topic, but I could also talk about the Pacific slave trade. 
    reply 17 minutes
    Ghostling
    Ghostling posted in Food:
    Vegetables=Potatoes. Potatoes=Chips (crisps). Chips=Good.
    reply about 2 hours

    play online games

    Candy-100

    A great online version of the famous Candy Crush. This is the best game launched...

    1515_gl_kidzworld_100x100_jpg_fz

    Intriguing planets, weird and wonderful characters; challenge friends and find a...

    157262_(2)

    When you go back to Candyland, you’ll wonder why you ever left in the first plac...

    100x100_ra_logo_girl

    Uncle George has left you his farm, but unfortunately it’s in pretty bad shape. ...

    _thumb_100x100

    Shoot blobs with different properies to merge yellow blobs. Your blobs can be re...