-
x

Meet New Friends!

Recommended friends are based on your interests. Make sure they are up to date.

Friends ff8c072dd79a91c1300f032d674241a8d64367100ffb1f25fa3f9bec4a05319f
Kidzworld Logo

Children’s Day

May 28, 2011

May 5 is Children's Day in Japan, when families celebrate the healthy growth and happiness of children. It became a national holiday in 1948, but it has been a day of celebration in the Asian country since ancient times.

The Facts

In ancient Japanese times, the fifth day of the fifth month was traditionally called Tango no Sekku and was a festival for boys only. Girls had their own festival, called Hina Matsuri (Doll Festival), held on the third day of the third month.

Today Children's Day families with boys fly huge carp-shaped streamers (koinobori) outside the house and display dolls of famous warriors and other heroes inside. The carp was chosen because it symbolizes strength and success; according to a Chinese legend, a carp swam upstream to become a dragon.

In recent years, as more people have moved into apartments and smaller houses, the carp streamers have also gotten smaller, and there are now miniature versions that decorate the indoors.

Also on this day, families often take baths sprinkled with iris leaves and roots. This is because the iris is thought to promote good health and ward off evil. Rice cakes wrapped in oak leaves and filled with sweet bean paste, called kashiwamochi, are also eaten.

The Scene

On May 5 of each year, events highlighting children are held throughout the country of Japan. At the National Kasumigaoka Stadium in Tokyo, tens of thousands of children and their parents participate in a Kids' Olympics. It has the look and feel of the real thing, since the National Kasumigaoka Stadium was the main arena for the 1964 Olympic Games in Tokyo. It even features a torch relay, and there are races for parents and kids in different age groups.

Many activities involve the arts. At the Yokohama Noh Theater one year, a kyogen recital was held that featured 18 young actors. The youngest of them was a second grader and the oldest was in the seventh grade.

Kyogen is a type of comic theater that was founded around 600 years ago and is performed with traditional costumes and a distinctive acting style. The kids had been attending practices once or twice a week since the summer of 1996 to learn the unique comic expressions, movements, and uses of the fan. One of the pieces performed was called Shibiri, in which a servant claims he can't run an errand for his master because every time he tries to do so his leg falls asleep.

The theater was packed with parents and friends, who not only enjoyed the humorous pieces but were also extremely impressed with the kids' convincing performances.

Related Stories
1 Comment

Related Stories

Hideki Matsui and his monsterous swing have earned him the nickname Godzilla and helped the Yanke...
Micro apolo ohno micro
Oh, no! Here comes Apolo. Meet the fastest guy on ice, who always has great hair - speedskater, A...
Long before Stone Cold and The Rock were jumping off the top ropes - wrestlers of a very differen...
F1038274007671

Should School Music Programs Be Cut?

  • No way, music is a very important art.
  • Maybe, if not enough people are interested.
  • Yes, who needs it.
  • I don't care cuz I'm not in music.

General In The Forums

H3LLSCRIVVER
H3LLSCRIVVER posted in Random:
Cheer
reply about 1 hour
Abbergrl
Abbergrl posted in Random:
Hopeless
reply about 1 hour
drowning
drowning posted in Random:
[s:p/1mku]
reply about 1 hour
drowning
drowning posted in Say Anything:
[s:p/1mkw]
reply about 2 hours
drowning
drowning posted in Random:
I'm currently waiting to go take my written test and taking online practice tests in the mean time. I've never quite been in a huge rush to get mine, despite being 17 now. I never really needed my license until now. Don't fret too much over and just look at the extra time as an opportunity to study/practice more; truly make sure you're ready.
reply about 2 hours