-
x

Meet New Friends!

Recommended friends are based on your interests. Make sure they are up to date.

Friends
Kidzworld Logo

The Clone Codes Book Review

The Clone Codes Book Review - Reviewed by Kidzworld on Mar 11, 2010
( Rating: 5 Star Rating)

In year 2170, history repeats itself. You’d think the future would bring happiness and freedom for all. But sometimes lessons learned are forgotten. Kidzworld reviews The Clone Codes by the McKissacks, a futuristic sci-fi book for teens.

The Clone Codes Rating: 5


Author: The McKissacks

In year 2170, history repeats itself. You’d think the future would bring happiness and freedom for all. But sometimes lessons learned are forgotten. Kidzworld reviews The Clone Codes by the McKissacks, a futuristic sci-fi book for teens.


Virtual School

Leanna is your average 13 year old. Her father and twin sister died in a farcar accident when she was young. Now she lives with her mother. She is one of the first teens to attend a new All-Virtual School. No more crowded hallways, no need to leave home. She attends class virtually, seeing and hearing her classmates as if they were actually there. But the best part is the history lessons. Instead of reading boring textbooks, Leanna gets to experience historical moments virtually, like bring a slave on the run with Harriet Tubman.


The Liberty Bell Movement

In reality, the world is constantly evolving. Clones live amongst people, but they’re not considered sentient (they don’t have human emotions). But Leanna’s mother thinks otherwise. She’s part of an illegal organization called The Liberty Bell Movement, who fight for clone rights. Unfortunately, the government considers them terrorists.


Proof

But The Liberty Bell Movement has proof that clones are just like humans, proof that is both illegal and revolutionary. And it’s up to Leanna to change her beliefs, face a horrifying truth, and fight for the cause.


The Bottom Line

The Clone Codes is both educational and exciting for sci-fi lovers. The story is a futurist version of past events. In the 1800’s, black slaves weren’t given the same rights as other people. They weren’t considered fully functional human beings. Nowadays, that logic seems ridiculous. So why would the functionality of clones be any different? The Clone Codes really makes your fight for the underdogs. It’s a powerful story.


Related Articles:

  • Ethics of Cloning
  • Replica 14: The Beginning Book Review
  • Double Identity Book Review
  • The Hunger Games Book Review


  • 4 Comments

    Related Stories

    Do you have your light sabers powered up? Are you ready for the biggest flick of the summer? Chec...
    The quarterback can't throw, the sprinter can hardly walk and, worst of all, Amy has boyfriend tr...
    Scientists from all over the world are racing to clone the first human. Some even think they can ...
    F1107381425812

    How Much Do You Know About Black History Month?

    • I never heard of it.
    • A little.
    • Everything - ask me a question!
    • I don't know.

    Random In The Forums

    -Gwen9--
    -Gwen9-- posted in New Users:
    I commented Jordan about it. I found it a great idea. 
    reply 9 minutes
    Black_Rose_19
    Black_Rose_19 posted in Debating:
    Haha, I guess after looking at your facts, you win. I still am pretty bad at this, so I'm quick to give up, but you've actually successfully changed my opinion on this, so props to you. Well, that's what I get for messing with the master.
    reply 10 minutes
    naruto200
    naruto200 posted in New Users:
    Yeah, i'm not blaming you for that. Just, they might find it annoying. But kw should make a tutorial video for kw though. That would be so appreciated by new users.
    reply 19 minutes
    -Gwen9--
    -Gwen9-- posted in New Users:
    I don't mean for it to be spread out into posts, but there is a character limit. 
    reply 26 minutes
    AlphaT
    AlphaT posted in Debating:
    "Black_Rose_19" wrote:I originally got this story from a source that most people wouldn't exactly call credible , a comedy/politics TV show, but after checking their sources, I believe I have a strong case with decently strong sources.  I hope so. I'm using the same source that John used for debate's sake.  "Black_Rose_19" wrote:You are incorrect when you said you'd only have to pay for labor and materials, as several other factors come into play. Factors...such as? "Black_Rose_19" wrote: Also, where I said 1000 feet, I very much apologize, more like 1000 miles. It should cost about 10 billion for the concrete panels, and although concrete is cheap, it's not dirt cheap, and 1000 miles of concrete will add up to a pretty good amount.  It's okay, I adjusted ## ####### to miles, but somehow still said feet. The same estimate I gave is found in the article, which is around eight million cubic yards of concrete. This would total out to roughly thirty two billion pounds of concrete, which totals out to 533 million bags of concrete, each weighing sixty pounds. The average cost of a sixty pound bag of concrete is $2.83, which we them multiply by 533 million to get 1.5 billion.  This is where I messed up. I used the standard price of unmixed concrete, when I needed to use the standard price of precast slabs. Oliver's source does the rest:  "A cement manufacturer said prices are now running $85 to $90 a cubic yard, so that works out to about $700 million just for the concrete" However, in an update, they nixed the math all together and went with an anonymous economist's unevidenced estimate:  "He worked through some of the math, though he did not want to be identified publicly. Roughly, he said a wall of this type would cost at least $25 billion" This is what John Oliver used on his show. As the unknown economist cites no reason for us to think that the cost would be anywhere near his estimate, I see no reason to think his estimate is valid.  So, effectively, we've reduced the cost from 3 billion to 700 million. Let's the keep the billion dollar safe fund though. Total so far: 1.7 Billion "Black_Rose_19" wrote:Next it should cost 5-6 billion dollars for steel columns to hold the panels, including labor. Really? Including labor? Fine with me. I'm honestly not sure how much steel would be needed for each panel, so I'll defer to this estimate.  Total Cost so far: 6.7 Billion "Black_Rose_19" wrote:Add another billion for concrete footing and foundations, and that's sixteen billion dollars. The Washington Post article included foundation in their total assessment of the concrete required. "Black_Rose_19" wrote:But, transport is required to inaccessible areas. It will cost about another 2 billion dollars to build roads that will allow 20 ton trucks to carry materials to the wall. At ten million dollars per mile, a road spanning the entire length of the wall would require ten billion dollars. Why do you think a fifth of this cost would be required?  The average cost of a road which would allow such transport is 5 million per mile. Let's overestimate the length that would be required to two hundred miles. That gets you to 1 billion.  Total cost so far: 7.7 Billion "Black_Rose_19" wrote:We also need engineering, design, and management, which brings us up to the magic number of 25 billion dollars, on average considering all factors. The Congressional Budget office also says that wall management costs will exceed the original cost to build the wall in as little as seven years. From your previous estimate of eighteen billion, I'll assume that you're factoring in seven billion dollars worth of engineering, design, and management? Why do you think it'll cost that much? To pay every engineer, designer, and manager who would ever work on the wall...I'd put aside about 1.5 billion. Total cost: 9.2 Billion Well what do you know. About a sixth of the annual trade deficit with Mexico, and almost a third of your original estimate.  "Black_Rose_19" wrote:With the Mexico paying for it part, as John Oliver, the host of this show, says, "People don't exactly love it when you make them pay for [expletive] they don't want." The current Mexican treasury secretary states, "Mexico, under no circumstance, is going to pay for the wall that Mr. Trump is proposing." 2 former Mexican presidents that only recently left office also say, in a nutshell, that Mexico will never pay for the wall.  They won't love it, but they will pay for it. If they refuse, Trump plans to put a 35% tariff on all Mexican import. In other words, every company in Mexico will have to pay 35% the value of whatever they're bringing into The United States. Mexico will lose more money paying this tariff than they would by financing the wall, so either way the United States gets the money it needs to build the wall from Mexico. 
    reply 39 minutes