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Dealing With Diabetes

Dealing With Diabetes - Reviewed by Kidzworld on Dec 27, 2006
( Rating: 1 Star Rating)

Do you or someone you know suffer from type 1 or 2 diabetes? Here's some more information Kidzworld about diabetes and how it can be treated, diagnosed and prevented...

Whether you know someone who has diabetes or not, it's a disease that you'll come in contact with eventually - with more than 18 million Americans dealing with it on a daily basis. Diabetes affects the pancreas, which is the organ in your body that produces insulin. You need insulin to break sugar down into energy for your cells. When people have diabetes, their pancreas isn't able to produce the insulin that their body needs, which causes a whole ton of trouble for their bodies! Read on to find out who's at risk and how you can help prevent diabetes!

Type 1 Diabetes: Dealing With the Disease

Type 1 diabetes is also known as insulin-dependent diabetes or juvenile diabetes. This is the kind of diabetes that's genetic, which means people are born with it and have to treat it with insulin shots for the rest of their lives. There's usually something that triggers the onset of Type 1 diabetes, like a viral flu or something else in the environment.

Type 2 Diabetes: When Obesity Causes Health Troubles

Type 2 diabetes is also known as adult-onset diabetes and is the most common type of the disease. The reason it's called adult-onset diabetes is because, for the most part, this is the kind of diabetes that adults develop later in life due to unhealthy lifestyles. When people are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, it means that their pancreas can produce insulin, but it's unable to make enough to keep up with the sugar in that person's body. In recent years, more kids have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes because of an increase in childhood obesity. Between 90-95 percent of all people who suffer from diabetes are afflicted by this type of the disease.

Diabetes: Recognizing the Symptoms

When you have diabetes, your body doesn't have the tools necessary to burn sugar properly, so sugar ends up piling up in your blood. Your kidneys then try to help the situation by filtering out all that excess sugar, which causes you to pee a lot more. No matter how much you eat, your body can't convert it into usable energy - creating a vicious cycle of thirst, hunger, weight loss, fatigue and sometimes even nausea. Type 2 diabetes often takes a lot longer to diagnose because symptoms don't always show up all at once.

Diabetes: Treatment Options

Depending on the type of diabetes that a person has, sometimes the disease can be managed simply with a change in diet and exercise routine. Type 1 always has to be treated with insulin, but both types can be made more manageable by cutting out fatty foods, excess sugars, carbohydrates and by engaging in physical activity on a regular basis. This is especially true for kids who are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

1 My mom is an insulin-dependant diabetic. She has been since age 13. Since it is genetic, but skips a generation, I did not get diabetes (thank the Lord), but sadly, my child and/or third child will get diabetes, according to my mom. See, these people invented a really nifty pump that pumps insulin into her body through a tube, and instead of taking shots every meal, all she has to do is tell it the amount of insulin she needs (according to what she eats) and it gives it to her. She changes the tube every four days (sanitary reasons). It's really easy for her. The reason my grandfather had diabetes is cause it was Type 2. Diabetes can also be hard finacially, because it often causes other disoders in the body, such as arthritis and glaucoma, which means we have to get more prescription medicines along with the insulin needed. Diabetes is much more than just a disease.

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Nickname: spoonerouno
Age: 14

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hugebear
hugebear posted in Family Issues:
You doesnt have to come out to your family until your ready and until they is ready too.  If you blurt it out it could be the shock.  You says that you think your Mums side of the family will be more supportive.  Has you got an Aunty or Uncle what you could discuss this with?  An adult member of your family what is most likely supportive  could probably give the best advises on how to tell your family and when and how and prepares you for how they will react. Good luck mate and takes your time :angel
reply about 3 hours
Mrawsomegamer
I think my mothers side of the family would be fine with it. It's my dad's side I'm most concerned about. My dad says some dreadfully terrible remarks about homosexual people. I think I'm not gunna tell him at all. Ever...  Either way. Thanks for the advice!
reply about 3 hours
Kirsteeeeen
If you don't think that you'll be in a safe situation (for example, your parents try to kick you out, or hurt you physically or emotionally) than you should definitely wait to tell them. I think you'll know when the time is right. We can't tell you how they'll react, but I bet you can sort of figure it out from how they feel and act about these topics.  Remember, you are not obligated to tell anybody at all. It's personal. Wait until you're for sure ready to tell them. And when you do, tell them the way in which it's easiest. Get your point across, offer resources, reassurance, and give them time. 
reply about 3 hours
Mrawsomegamer
Hey guys, so I do kinda have a personal issue, but I need to tell my family about it. Truth is, I'm not even sure how they'll even react. Very few of my friends know, only the ones I trust anyway... I'm gay. Or at least bisexual. I kinda had a thing for girls, but that was a long time ago. I think I'm fully gay. I have a very supportive boyfriend, who loves me with all his heart. But that's not what it's about; it's actually coming out to my family, whom I know some of them are quite homophobic. Homophobia runs in my family. Sorta...  It makes my stomach turn when I think about it. I sometimes look into the mirror, look at myself and think if my conscience suddenly made me decide I was gay, or if I was born with it. Science tells us that we are born that way, due to lack of man chemicals entering a boys brain when in development. I feel like I've chosen it (even though I know deep inside I haven't) to be gay, probably because of my family almost forcing me into getting a girlfriend and such. I come from a Catholic family, to make things even worse. I'm like the only practising person in my family, but somehow I feel that they'll use my Faith against me if I come out.  So, should I just wait until I'm older? How do I know when the time is right? How will they even react? How should I even say it?  Please help!
reply about 4 hours
Kirsteeeeen
Kirsteeeeen posted in Friends:
This thread has been moved. Click here to see the new thread.
reply about 5 hours

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