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Becoming a Cruelty Investigator

Working at the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) isn't just about adopting out cats and dogs and the occasional guinea pig or rabbit. There's a lot more to the job than that. Just ask Constable Dean Edmonds. He's a Special Provincial Constable who probably hasn't had a dull day in his 26 years on the job.

If Dean's not finding homes for animals all day, what does he do? "I'm the superintendent. I supervise all aspects of shelter operations, (like staffing, report writing, accounting and general supervision of shelter and road staff,)" explains Dean. "I enforce sections of the criminal code relating to cruelty to animals." That means if you're abusing your pet, Dean has enough authority to have you charged. As a Special Constable, he can also search your home.

After arriving for work Dean coordinates staffing shifts. He also deals with a lot of complaints from the public. "I coordinate, receive and attend calls pertaining to animal cruelties and delegate actions taken by pet owners to improve the health and living conditions of their pet." His day isn't over yet. "I involve myself in the adopting of animals to the public and counsel potential animal adoptees on how to care and control pets." Dean also attends animal emergencies, like if a dog has been hit by a car. You might have even heard Dean on the radio or seen him on TV talking about general animal welfare.


For Dean, the best part is relieving the distress of animals. The worst part is the ignorance he sees in some people regarding their lack of concern or passion for their friends - cats and dogs and other pets. Dean's been trained to deal with almost everything he encounters. He took several SPCA related courses about animal care, animal husbandry (husbandry means the breeding and caring for domestic animals) and he also has a Justice Institute Certificate for Special Constable.

If you're interested in a job as a cruelty investigator the pay starts as low as $13.50/hr CAN. A Special Provincial Constable, like Dean, makes around $50,000 a year. His advice to kids who want his job is "remain calm and professional. Retain sensitivity and compassion for animals, but realize you are acting in a professional capacity at all times. Keep an objective outlook."

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Alex227
Alex227 posted in Friends:
You should if you really want to, but I don't think it should matter the amount of knowledge you and your friends have, because friendship is merely friendship! :) Plus, when you tell them, it may come across as bragging and they would perceive you as a show-off. Hope this helps!
reply about 3 hours
hugebear
hugebear posted in Friends:
Congratulations on being gifted and getting all the opportunties what your getting :) You knows your friends better than any of us and how does you think they will react if you tell them?  Thinks about if one of your friends told you and how you would feel.  Be proud and enjoy your learning and you will meet other gifted people too in your classes and ask them their experiences too of how/if they told friends. If it was me then I probably wouldnt but thats just me personality. I wouldnt ever get in the gifted group anyway so I doesnt really have to think about this :)
reply about 9 hours
__dischic3__
__dischic3__ posted in Style:
today I got my hair down...chillin'
reply about 17 hours
Teh_Skittlez
Teh_Skittlez posted in Friends:
Don't go out of your way to talk about it. A lot of people are off put by people who talk about their intelligence a lot. If it comes up in a conversation, you can talk about it, but you probably won't need to tell them. Usually with people who are genuinely intelligent, they don't need to talk about their intelligence, it's obvious to everyone around you, and therefore people who are not as intelligent might feel like you're rubbing it in. 
reply 1 day
jordand08
jordand08 posted in Friends:
Maybe you should wait until you feel a little bit more comfy talking to them, and then tell them!  :D
reply 1 day

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