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Seven Wonders of the World - Colossus of Rhodes

When Was the Colossus of Rhodes Built?

Construction started around 304 BC.

Where is the Colossus of Rhodes Located?

At the entrance to the harbor of the island of Rhodes in Greece.

What is the History of the Colossus of Rhodes?

After winning a long war against the Antigonids of Macedonia, the Rhodians celebrated their victory by building an enormous statue of their patron sun god, Helios. Apparently, construction of the Colossus (a word that means a huge statue) took 12 years to complete. The Colossus only stood for 56 years, which isn't long for something considered one of the seven wonders of the world. Around 226 BC, a violent earthquake hit Rhodes and collapsed the statue at the knees. The Rhodians were afraid of a curse so they didn't dare replace it. It lay in pieces for many centuries before Arab pirates took the bronze pieces and sold them.

What Does the Colossus of Rhodes Look Like?

The base of the statue was made of white marble, which is where the feet and ankles were first fixed. Bronze plates were put over an iron framework (the Statue of Liberty is copper over a steel frame.) When the Colossus was finished, it stood around 33 meters (110 feet) high. Although none of the statue still exists, this wonder of the world inspired many artists, including Auguste Bartholdi who made the Statue of Liberty.

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The Eighth Wonder? Vote!

  • Your bedroom.
  • That ball of snot you've been saving for the past year.
  • Your mom's meatloaf surprise.
  • The hair growing out of Grandma's chin.

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CaptJolee
CaptJolee posted in Electronics:
"MajorGamer11" wrote:Roblox <3 yay more robloxians :3
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MajorGamer11
Roblox <3
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Jolly-Rancher206
It depends. Some religions are incredibly syncretic like Buddhism/ other Eastern religions and don't have a concept of "one true religion or doctrine", so they do lend themselves to being blended. Others claim to be the only truth (Christianity, Islam) so those wouldn't allow combination.  A lot of religions are actually a mix of multiple traditions. Sikhism, Baha'i, Gnosticism to name a few. 
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Jolly-Rancher206
"simran88" wrote:Which country's schooling system are you talking about? Because different countries' schooling systems need to be different as each country is different and has different needs like Finland's schooling system and Korea's schooling system are very different but both the systems are considered to be excellent.    I personally think that more than schools it depends on the teachers. For example, in India, CCE was introduced to make studies more practical and applicable but because many teachers did not understand the system properly it only ended up becoming a pain for us and the level of our studies dropped making parents think that the system was not good.  I completely agree. More than curriculum (although important), it's teachers that make the difference in the quality of a school system. Yes, education will be different from country to country, but I think at bottom everyone wants kids learning the basics as well as info relevant to when they enter the workforce.  What do we consider excellent? Korea may have good science and math scores, but do their students have creative thinking skills? Can they problem solve or think critically? We tend to think of "good" schools excelling in rote knowledge, but is that all that matters? I'd say no.
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Jolly-Rancher206
To be fair, aren't most American high schoolers are required to take economic senior year or somewhere around there, where they should be teaching you about personal finance? That was my experience. My school also offers a financial literacy course, but I do think should be mandatory. But yeah, issues in education is a tired refrain, but I don't see widespread improvement. I think about changing the way we do teaching itself. I don't think teachers are paid enough or are given enough freedom with curriculum. It's no longer seen as a respectable job, and you have people that really don't care. When someone's underpaid and told their standardized test scores will make or break them, don't expect the quality of instruction to be stellar. Don't expect an intellectually stimulating environment that fosters creativity or critical thinking. There's no time for that with a bajillion state tests to pass. It's one of the most important professions a person can have imo; it's a shame. 
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