-
x

Meet New Friends!

Recommended friends are based on your interests. Make sure they are up to date.

Friends ff8c072dd79a91c1300f032d674241a8d64367100ffb1f25fa3f9bec4a05319f
Kidzworld Logo

Hidden Figures – What an Inspiration!

Hidden Figures – What an Inspiration! - Reviewed by Kidzworld on Jan 10, 2017
( Rating: 5 Star Rating)

In Hidden Figures, a team of African-American women provide NASA with important mathematical data needed to launch the programs first successful space missions. Read Talias movie review on Kidzworld!

By Talia Jacnuk, KIDS FIRST! Film Critic, age 13

Hidden Figures Video Review

 

This absolutely fantastic film will inspire so many people to never give up on their dreams and talents. It shows that you can do anything if you put your mind to it.

The women at NASAThe women at NASACourtesy of 20th Century Fox

The movie takes place in the 1960s where sexism and racial discrimination is still at a high. There is fear of the Soviet Union since they already have the technology to send astronauts into space, though there is still hope for America. This is a true story which revolves around three extremely intelligent African-American women - Katherine Johnson (Taraji P. Henson), Mary Jackson (Janelle Monáe) and Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia Spencer) who all work for the NASA program. They are the brains behind the launch of astronaut John Glenn (Glen Powell). The woman struggle with using their brilliance since they live in a world where the color of their skin defines who they are and who they are not going to be.

Katherine G. Johnson, stands out amid her team of fellow mathematiciansKatherine G. Johnson, stands out amid her team of fellow mathematiciansCourtesy of 20th Century Fox

The acting is fabulous! Taraji P. Henson is made to play Katherine Johnson. Taraji highlights the braveness and intelligence of her character, adding a bit of a quirky side as well. I feel that I know her character like a friend. Mary Jackson (Janelle Monáe) is my favorite character out of them all. She has this determination in her that is mind blowing. She can be very serious at times, but one of the most hilarious people at others. Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia Spencer) definitely takes on the leader role. When watching this film you feel for her struggles and want her to succeed so badly. Octavia brings boldness and sarcasm that just makes you adore her. I felt the strong friendship between these women.

Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Dorothy Vaughan celebrate their stunning achievementsMary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Dorothy Vaughan celebrate their stunning achievementsCourtesy of 20th Century Fox

I could tell how much time was spent in designing the set and costumes. The sets are so realistic that I felt transformed into that time period. I loved looking at the small details added to each set. Renee Ehrlich Kalfus designed the costumes which are so colorful and suit each character perfectly. It is so interesting to see how different the clothes were back then. The costumes helped add to it being the 60s.

Katherine, Dorothy and Mary meet the man they helped send into orbit, John GlennKatherine, Dorothy and Mary meet the man they helped send into orbit, John GlennCourtesy of 20th Century Fox

My favorite scene is when Al Harrison (Kevin Costner) breaks down the colored woman’s bathroom sign to show that everyone can share the same restroom. Al Harrison is the head of the NASA launch program. This is my favorite scene because I loved seeing someone who looked beyond the color of people’s skin.

Jim Parsons as Paul Stafford, Taraji P. Henson as Katherine G. Johnson, and Kevin Costner as Al HarrisonJim Parsons as Paul Stafford, Taraji P. Henson as Katherine G. Johnson, and Kevin Costner as Al HarrisonCourtesy of 20th Century Fox

The main message of this film is to never give up on your dreams, even when people tell you that you can’t. The three woman look beyond their gender and their skin color. They look at the talents they have. One example of this is when Katherine Johnson is talking to Jim Johnson. Jim is surprised as to why they are having a woman do such important things at NASA. Katherine retorts with an inspiring line “Yes they let women do some things at NASA Mister Johnson. And it’s not because we wear skirts. It’s because we wear glasses!” I recommend this film for ages 9 to 18. The younger audiences will enjoy learning about the past and be inspired to shoot for the stars. The older audiences will like the comedy and the amazing story. I give this film a 5 out of 5 astronaut stars. In theaters now so go check it out!

Hidden Figures Movie Rating: 5

Hidden Figures PosterHidden Figures PosterCourtesy of 20th Century Fox
Read More Movie Reviews from KIDS FIRST!

 

 

3 Comments

Related Stories

Micro a monster calls micro
Kidzworld reviews A Monster Calls, a fantasy/drama movie based on a novel by Patrick Ness. In tim...
Micro fences review micro
Fences is the story about an African-American father struggling with race relations in the United...
Micro doctor strange micro
Read KIDS FIRST! Film Critic Gerry's movie review of Marvel's Doctor Strange, that follows the st...
Micro stork review micro
Read KIDS FIRST film critic Gerry's review of Storks, about those eloquent birds known for delive...
What is the sun?
  • The sun is a planet.
  • The sun is a star.
  • The sun is another galaxy.
  • The sun is another solar system.

Entertainment In The Forums

yugimutoz
:D :D :D
reply 40 minutes
Springstorm
I'm reading Bad Magic by Pseudonymous Bosch. It's an excellent book so far! It's a young adult modern mystery semi-fantasy.
reply about 4 hours
-Oracle-
The Manchurian Candidate - Richard Cordon
reply about 10 hours
Kidsrule18
A Tweens World Wengie
reply about 13 hours
Kidsrule18
I love A Tweens World and Wengie
reply about 13 hours