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Midnight Predator Book Review

Midnight Predator Book Review - Reviewed by Kidzworld on Dec 27, 2006
( Rating: 5 Star Rating)

In Midnight Predator, Amelia Atwater-Rhodes continues with her signature writing style - mildly poetic and very intense. The topic? Vampires, of course!

Author: Amelia Atwater-Rhodes

The Plot

Midnight Predator, Amelia Atwater Rhodes' fourth book, introduces her fans to the most fierce guild of human vampire-hunters: Bruja's Crimson, Onyx and Frost. Turquoise Draka is one of the best in the guild known as Crimson. She and fellow hunter (but rival,) Ravyn are given the assignment of assassinating the vampiress known as Jeshickah. Jeshickah once created a vamp empire called Midnight that ruled not only her own kind, but the shapeshifters, witches and humans as well. Turquoise is still haunted by her past which had her endure the Midnight's human slave trade. Well, wouldn't ya know it - the empire is back in full-force and Turquoise must enter back into it as a slave in order to fulfill her assignment.


Worth a Read

In Midnight Predator, Amelia continues her signature writing style - mildly poetic, kinda deep and very intense. At first, you may not dig Turquoise as, like some of Amelia Atwater-Rhodes' other characters, she comes across as way too intense, like someone who hasn't cracked a smile since they were two years old. Then, just like the other characters did, Turquoise quickly becomes a friend and you find yourself absorbed in her life, her problems and her growing attraction to Jaguar. (You know, that sexy vamp that's been mentioned in a couple of previous books.)


Once again, Amelia Atwater-Rhodes has penned a successful, haunting and spooky vampire tale. This girl may only be in her teens, but her storytelling has her right up there with the likes of Clive Barker, Anne Rice and Christopher Pike!


Midnight Predator Rating:5


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  • 1 Comment

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    Which Character Would You Be?

    • I'd be one of Amelia's vampire hunters, like Turquoise from Midnight Predator.
    • I'd be the writer Jessica, from Demon in My View.
    • I'd be a vampire, like Risika from In The Forests of the Night.
    • I'd be a royal witch just like Sarah Vida from Shattered Mirror.

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