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All About Snowflakes

Snow. It's not the most mysterious thing, is it? It's white, cold and if enough of it falls, you don't have to go to school. But do you even know what snowflakes are made out of? Probably not - so keep reading!

Snowflakes - Where Do They Come From?

Snowflakes come from clouds, which are really just big clusters of water vapor. This water vapor scatters and forms ice crystals or rain in the clouds, depending on the temperature. The temperature must be below zero degrees Celsius (32 degrees F) for the water to turn into ice crystals. The ice crystals also contain tiny bits of dirt that the wind has blown around the atmosphere (and it sometimes even contains dust from space). These ice crystals (also called snow crystals) cluster together to form individual snowflakes. One snowflake can be made up of anywhere between two and 200 separate snow crystals.

Snowflakes - No Two Look The Same

There are a few reasons that no two snowflakes look the same. One thing that influences the size and shape of a snowflake are temperature changes:

  • 30 degrees Fahrenheit (-1 degrees Celsius) - Snowflakes usually look like columns.
  • 27 to 23 degrees Fahrenheit (-2 to -5 degrees Celsius) - Snowflakes usually form a needle shape.
  • 23 to 18 degrees Fahrenheit (-5 to -7 degrees Celsius) - Snowflakes usually look like columns appear again.
  • 18 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit (-7 to -12 degrees Celsius) - Snowflakes are usually shaped like a plate.
  • 10 to 3 degrees Fahrenheit (-12 to -16 degrees Celsius) - Snowflakes are usually shaped like a star.

Snowflakes come in all different shapes and sizes!Snowflakes come in all different shapes and sizes!

Snowflakes - What Else Affects its Shape?

Dirt can change the appearance of a snowflake as can the snow's "flight plan". If a snow crystal spins like a top as it falls, it will usually be symmetrical when it hits the ground. If a snow crystal falls sideways, then it will end up lopsided.

Snowfakes - Flakey Snow Facts

  • An average raindrop falls 600 feet per minute while the average snowflake falls at about 11 feet per minute.
  • Algae (simple plants with no roots, stems, leaves or flowers) can live in water, soil, sand and even snow.
  • Dirty snow melts faster than clean snow. This is because the impurities (dirt particles) hold a higher temperature than the snow crystals.
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Random In The Forums

Black_Rose_19
Black_Rose_19 posted in Debating:
I originally got this story from a source that most people wouldn't exactly call credible , a comedy/politics TV show, but after checking their sources, I believe I have a strong case with decently strong sources. You are incorrect when you said you'd only have to pay for labor and materials, as several other factors come into play. Also, where I said 1000 feet, I very much apologize, more like 1000 miles. It should cost about 10 billion for the concrete panels, and although concrete is cheap, it's not dirt cheap, and 1000 miles of concrete will add up to a pretty good amount. Next it should cost 5-6 billion dollars for steel columns to hold the panels, including labor.  Add another billion for concrete footing and foundations, and that's sixteen billion dollars. But, transport is required to inaccessible areas. It will cost about another 2 billion dollars to build roads that will allow 20 ton trucks to carry materials to the wall. We also need engineering, design, and management, which brings us up to the magic number of 25 billion dollars, on average considering all factors. The Congressional Budget office also says that wall management costs will exceed the original cost to build the wall in as little as seven years. With the Mexico paying for it part, as John Oliver, the host of this show, says, "People don't exactly love it when you make them pay for [expletive] they don't want." The current Mexican treasury secretary states, "Mexico, under no circumstance, is going to pay for the wall that Mr. Trump is proposing." 2 former Mexican presidents that only recently left office also say, in a nutshell, that Mexico will never pay for the wall. 
reply 9 minutes
Black_Rose_19
Black_Rose_19 posted in Debating:
I'll have to dig into that a little more, I only had about 2 sources to go off of, one of them being a private party. I am aware that scientific or economic articles aren't always correct, so I'll have to fact check this myself before I can properly reply to you.
reply 39 minutes
AlphaT
AlphaT posted in Debating:
I'd say it's a good idea, but I don't think the economist is correct. Firstly, even if he were correct, the price of the wall only comes to about half the annual trade deficit that we have with Mexico. If Mexico is making 58 billion off of us every year, then they have 25 billion to spare to pay for the wall.  But more to the point, I don't think it'll cost that much. What you'll need is money to pay for two things:  1. Materials 2. Labor You need 1.5 billion pounds worth of pre-made concrete slabs installed to create the entire wall. Concrete is ridiculously cheap, and you'd only be out three billion on concrete. Then you need steel connections between each slab, so let's add another five billion for that. Let's also add a billion dollar safe fund, in case some parts of the wall need a little something extra.  That leaves you with eleven billion dollars worth of labor before you get anywhere near the price that this economist came up with. Which is why I think he's very mistaken. 
reply about 1 hour
Black_Rose_19
Black_Rose_19 posted in Debating:
Before we start this, I have two requests. 1. Be civil to each other, rebuttal other people's statements with facts, not just random insults. I have seen debates where people are just mindlessly bullying each other, and I would hate for this to turn up like that. 2. Don't go against Donald Trump on this topic just because you think he's a racist or something. Focus on the topic at hand, please. So, we've all heard about the infamous wall. However, I have one reason that the wall might not be such a wonderful idea. Donald Trump has said that the wall will be at mimimum 35 feet tall, and again, at minimum,  1000 feet long.  Now, an economist estimated that this will cost 25 billion dollars, including costs to transport supplies, the materials, and labor, along with several other costs. This exceeds what Donald Trump says the wall would cost by 13 to 21 billion dollars. Do you still think the wall is a good idea, and remember the two requests, or no, I'd rather call them rules, I listed about a paragraph ago. 
reply about 1 hour
AlphaT
AlphaT posted in Debating:
"donteatcarrots" wrote: in the end though, a gun shoots someone. and they could die from it. usa need better laws though smh A knife stabs someone. An arrow shoots through someone. A piece of rope strangles someone. A large bite of steak chokes someone. A grocery bag suffocates someone. Just because someone can die from something, is that a reason to restrict it? 
reply about 2 hours