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America – The Making Of A Nation :: From Sea To Shining Sea

When the first settlers arrived from Europe, they settled on the East Coast of America because it reminded them of home. But, if they thought everything in this new land would be familiar, they were very wrong. Once the new Americans had their independence, they set out to explore their great new land, and discovered natural wonders never seen in the Old World. Here are a few of those amazing sites.

The State of Alaska

The largest state in America (twice the size of Texas), Alaska covers a wide range of landscapes, from tundra roamed by caribou to snow-capped mountains inside the Arctic Circle.

The State of Hawaii

The gorgeous Hawaiian islands are volcanic. The group of eight main islands, plus many other smaller ones, stretch a total distance of 1,500 miles.

Old Faithful (WY)

This natural geyser in Wyoming’s Yellowstone Park sends a gush of scalding water up to 184 feet into the air every 90 minutes or so.

Death Valley (CA, NV)

140 miles long, this valley is the lowest, hottest and driest place in North America. The temperature at Furnace Creek once reached 134 F (almost 57 C) – the second-highest temperature ever recorded on Earth, next to 136 F (58 C) in Libya. The valley was named by some settlers who got lost in it while they were exploring in 1849. In fact, one of them died in the valley.

Bryce Canyon (UT)

The rock spires in this area of southwest Utah are called “hoodoos.” They’ve been worn away by millions of years of water and wind. The result are these breathtaking orange, white and red rock foundations.

Grand Canyon (AZ)

Over 270 miles long, up to 18 miles across and a mile deep, the Grand Canyon definitely deserves the title of world’s largest gorge. The oldest rocks in the canyon date back 2 BILLION years! Approximately 5 million people come to visit the canyon each year – and hundreds of hikers among those need to be rescued annually.

Rocky Mountains

The majestic Rockies stretch more than 3,000 miles, all the way up north to Canada and through nine different American states: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. The highest peak among these mountains belongs to Mt. Elbert, Colorado, at 14,440 feet (Mt. Everest – the highest in the world – measures in at 29,035 feet).

Mississippi River

This monster of a river is 2,350 miles long – the fourth-longest in the world, following (No. 1) the Nile at 4,135 miles, the Amazon River at 3,980 miles, and the Yangtze at 3,917 miles. The great river rushes through a total of 10 different American states: Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana and, finally, Mississippi. The Mississippi’s width varies from 20 feet to four miles wide. And here’s a little-known fact: waterskiing was invented on the Mississippi.

Okefenokee

This 7,000-year-old swamp covers 700 square miles in the states of Georgia and Florida. The murky water – stained a dark color by tannins, a type of plant acid – separates unstable islands of dark peat. Its name comes from a Choctaw Indian word, which means “land of the tembling earth.”

Niagara Falls (Ontario, Canada, NY)

The famous waterfalls of the Niagara River straddle the international border between Canada and America. The falls were formed when glaciers receded at the end of the last ice age, and water from the newly formed Great Lakes carved a path through the land on its way to the Atlantic Ocean. The falls’ drop ranges from 173 feet to 100 feet. Not only beautiful, the falls are an important source of hydroelectric power.

In October of 1829, Sam Patch, who called himself the Yankee Leapster, jumped from a high tower into a gorge below the falls and survived. In 1901, a 63-year-old school teacher named Annie Edson was the first person to go over the falls in a barrel. She too survived, though she warned that no one should ever try the stunt again. People didn’t listen; since her ride, 14 others have intentionally gone over the falls, even though it’s illegal.

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Black_Rose_19
Black_Rose_19 posted in Debating:
I originally got this story from a source that most people wouldn't exactly call credible , a comedy/politics TV show, but after checking their sources, I believe I have a strong case with decently strong sources. You are incorrect when you said you'd only have to pay for labor and materials, as several other factors come into play. Also, where I said 1000 feet, I very much apologize, more like 1000 miles. It should cost about 10 billion for the concrete panels, and although concrete is cheap, it's not dirt cheap, and 1000 miles of concrete will add up to a pretty good amount. Next it should cost 5-6 billion dollars for steel columns to hold the panels, including labor.  Add another billion for concrete footing and foundations, and that's sixteen billion dollars. But, transport is required to inaccessible areas. It will cost about another 2 billion dollars to build roads that will allow 20 ton trucks to carry materials to the wall. We also need engineering, design, and management, which brings us up to the magic number of 25 billion dollars, on average considering all factors. The Congressional Budget office also says that wall management costs will exceed the original cost to build the wall in as little as seven years. With the Mexico paying for it part, as John Oliver, the host of this show, says, "People don't exactly love it when you make them pay for [expletive] they don't want." The current Mexican treasury secretary states, "Mexico, under no circumstance, is going to pay for the wall that Mr. Trump is proposing." 2 former Mexican presidents that only recently left office also say, in a nutshell, that Mexico will never pay for the wall. 
reply 9 minutes
Black_Rose_19
Black_Rose_19 posted in Debating:
I'll have to dig into that a little more, I only had about 2 sources to go off of, one of them being a private party. I am aware that scientific or economic articles aren't always correct, so I'll have to fact check this myself before I can properly reply to you.
reply 39 minutes
AlphaT
AlphaT posted in Debating:
I'd say it's a good idea, but I don't think the economist is correct. Firstly, even if he were correct, the price of the wall only comes to about half the annual trade deficit that we have with Mexico. If Mexico is making 58 billion off of us every year, then they have 25 billion to spare to pay for the wall.  But more to the point, I don't think it'll cost that much. What you'll need is money to pay for two things:  1. Materials 2. Labor You need 1.5 billion pounds worth of pre-made concrete slabs installed to create the entire wall. Concrete is ridiculously cheap, and you'd only be out three billion on concrete. Then you need steel connections between each slab, so let's add another five billion for that. Let's also add a billion dollar safe fund, in case some parts of the wall need a little something extra.  That leaves you with eleven billion dollars worth of labor before you get anywhere near the price that this economist came up with. Which is why I think he's very mistaken. 
reply about 1 hour
Black_Rose_19
Black_Rose_19 posted in Debating:
Before we start this, I have two requests. 1. Be civil to each other, rebuttal other people's statements with facts, not just random insults. I have seen debates where people are just mindlessly bullying each other, and I would hate for this to turn up like that. 2. Don't go against Donald Trump on this topic just because you think he's a racist or something. Focus on the topic at hand, please. So, we've all heard about the infamous wall. However, I have one reason that the wall might not be such a wonderful idea. Donald Trump has said that the wall will be at mimimum 35 feet tall, and again, at minimum,  1000 feet long.  Now, an economist estimated that this will cost 25 billion dollars, including costs to transport supplies, the materials, and labor, along with several other costs. This exceeds what Donald Trump says the wall would cost by 13 to 21 billion dollars. Do you still think the wall is a good idea, and remember the two requests, or no, I'd rather call them rules, I listed about a paragraph ago. 
reply about 1 hour
AlphaT
AlphaT posted in Debating:
"donteatcarrots" wrote: in the end though, a gun shoots someone. and they could die from it. usa need better laws though smh A knife stabs someone. An arrow shoots through someone. A piece of rope strangles someone. A large bite of steak chokes someone. A grocery bag suffocates someone. Just because someone can die from something, is that a reason to restrict it? 
reply about 2 hours