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Freeing Captive Whales - Is It The Right Thing?

The majority of you realize that keeping large, wild animals in confined spaces for our amusement is the wrong thing to do. So lately we have tried to change our wrong-doings by releasing animals like killer whale Keiko (a.k.a. Free Willy,) back into the wild. The average life span of a Killer Whale is about 35 years. And that's for a whale that has been treated a lot better than Keiko. Keiko lived to be 27.

Freeing Keiko - Can We Fix Our Mistakes?

What's so bad about trying to right our wrongs? Well, Keiko had been in captivity since he was two. Marineworld in Ontario, Canada bought Keiko in 1980 when he was first captured off the coast of Iceland. Five years later he was sold to an amusement park in Mexico City where he spent the next ten years of his life. It was there that he starred in the Warner Brother's Free Willy films. But three years after the original film was made, Keiko was rescued by a marina in Oregon because he wasn't being properly cared for in Mexico.

Keiko's Return To the "Wild"

It was soon decided that Keiko should be released back into the wild, near where he was born. It would take many years of rehabilitation, a ton of money and manpower. Keiko was finally moved to a fjord off Iceland in 1998. Although he did venture out into the ocean on his own, Keiko has returned to the fjord, longing for human contact. He won't fish on his own and developed colds due to stress. Volunteers didn't want to feed Keiko, trying to force him to survive on his own but the whale just wouldn't hunt for himself.

Keiko Moves to the Big Ocean in the Sky

On December 13th, 2003 Keiko died of pneumonia in the coastal waters of Norway. He was burried in a private funeral on December 14th, 2003 on the banks of the Norwegian fjord where he had spent the last five years. Although this is a sad end to the story of Keiko, his handlers are quick to point out that at least Keiko had five years of freedom before he died. Unfortunately this is not the case for the dozens of other Orcas still held in captivity around the world.

Related Stories:

  • Listening to Marine Life
  • Wild Things - Strange Looking Sharks
  • Wyland - Whaling Wall Murals - Ocean Art
  • More Thought-Provoking Rants!
  • 3 Comments

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    How Many Whales In Captivity?

    • I think there are 10 orcas left in captivity.
    • There must be at least 35 around the world.
    • Is it about 48 killer whales?
    • I thought Keiko was the last one.

    General In The Forums

    ThePaleWalker636
    Well, they should because of the community, in my opinion. Even though this site is "meant for kids", almost everyone I've met is very mature and friendly. Bullies and trolls are very rare, and there are lots of things to do with lots of people.
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    CaptJolee
    CaptJolee posted in Random:
    tbh the only good things about this website is the small talk and roleplays beyond that i prefer to not come on here
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    ScoobysFriend
    ScoobysFriend posted in Debating:
    "All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream" -Edgar Allen Poe 
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    IlikeGUYS20
    IlikeGUYS20 posted in Random:
    How about-It's a great place to make friends- It's a great way to stay in touchHope that helps!
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    drowning
    drowning posted in Debating:
    "According to the famous theory in quantum mechanics, 'The universe doesn't exist if we stop looking at it,' which argues that a particle's past behavior changes based on what we see. Last year, scientists performed a new experiment proving this theory to be true on the scale of atoms.   'The bizarre nature of reality as laid out by quantum theory has survived another test, with scientists performing a famous experiment and proving that reality does not exist until it is measured.'   According to the rules of quantum mechanics, the boundary between the 'world out there' and our own subjective consciousness are blurred. When physicists look at atoms or particles of light, what they see depends on how they have set up their experiment. To test this, physicists at the Australian National University recently conducted what is known as the John Wheeler's delayed-choice thought experiment. The experiment involves a moving object that is given the choice to act like a particle or a wave. Wheeler's experiment then asks - at which point does the object decide? Common sense says the object is either wave-like or particle-like, independent of how we measure it. But quantum physics predicts that whether you observe wave like behavior or particle behavior depends only on how it is actually measured at the end of its journey. 'It proves that measurement is everything. At the quantum level, reality does not exist if you are not looking at it,' said Associate Professor Andrew Truscott. Despite the apparent weirdness, the results confirm the validity of quantum theory. Quantum theory governs the world of the very small, and has enabled the development of many technologies such as LEDs, lasers and computer chips. The ĀNU reversed Wheeler's original concept of light beams being bounced by mirrors, and instead used atoms scattered by laser light."
    reply about 1 hour