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Book Review: Insurgent by Veronica Roth

May 31, 2012

Tris’s struggles continue in the sequel to Veronica Roth’s bestselling teen dystopian series, Divergent. Kidzworld has the book review of Insurgent.

After the War

Tris, her boyfriend Tobias and the remaining members of the Dauntless faction are picking up the pieces after the war that killed both of Tris’s parents. But it’s particularly difficult for Tris, who is constantly dealing with the grief of killing her friend Will. While she and her faction seek refuge in other factions, the Dauntless traitors are on her trail.

Jeanine’s Secret

Tris learns that Jeanine, the mastermind behind the faction war, is hiding something. And she overhears Tobias’s abusive father, Marcus, trying to find out what it is. In order to learn the truth, Tris must team up with Marcus and ultimately turn her back on Tobias.

Rise of the Factionless

Meanwhile, someone else (and we won’t say who!) has a plan of their own. They want to create an army of factionless to kill off the Erudite and abolish the entire faction system. But does Tris want that? Without the faction system, the world would turn to chaos. Then again, it’s already in chaos. How much worse could it get?

The Bottom Line

Insurgent by Veronica Roth didn’t quite live up to her first novel, Divergent. While this series has been highly praised, and even compared to The Hunger Games, we find that it lacks something. The overall concept is intriguing, but the plots drag at times and many parts are difficult to visualize. If you want to read every dystopian available, we recommend this book. However, if you only want to read the cream of the crop, we’d suggest other books like The Maze Runner series or The Knife of Never Letting Go.

Have Your Say

Did you like Insurgent by Veronica Roth? Tell us in our comment section below!



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What's your favorite topic in sci-fi books?

  • Dystopias (new corrupt societies, such as The Hunger Games)
  • Post-apocalyptic (end of the world novels, such as Divergent)
  • Epidemics (outbreaks of disease, such as The Scorch Trials)
  • Aliens and Other Planets (such as The Knife of Never Letting Go)

Random In The Forums

DavidBecker posted in General:
Ouija Board and the Ideomotor Response (Source: Wikipedia) Following its commercial introduction by businessman Elijah Bond on July 1, 1890, the Ouija board was regarded as a parlor game unrelated to the occult until American Spiritualist Pearl Curran popularized its use as a divining tool during World War I. Spiritualists believed that the dead were able to contact the living and reportedly used a talking board very similar to a modern Ouija board at their camps in Ohio in 1886 to ostensibly enable faster communication with spirits. Paranormal and supernatural beliefs associated with Ouija have been harshly criticized by the scientific community, since they are characterized as pseudoscience. The action of the board can be parsimoniously explained by unconscious movements of those controlling the pointer, a psychophysiological phenomenon known as the ideomotor effect Ideomotor phenomenon is a psychological phenomenon wherein a subject makes motions unconsciously. The phrase is most commonly used in reference to the process whereby a thought or mental image brings about a seemingly "reflexive" or automatic muscular reaction, often of minuscule degree, and potentially outside of the awareness of the subject. As in reflexive responses to pain, the body sometimes reacts reflexively with an ideomotor effect to ideas alone without the person consciously deciding to take action. The effects of automatic writing, dowsing, facilitated communication, and Ouija boards have been attributed to the phenomenon. Mystics have often attributed these effects to paranormal or supernatural force. Many subjects are unconvinced that their actions are originating solely from within themselves. Scientific tests by the English scientist Michael Faraday, Manchester surgeon James Braid, the French chemist Michel Eugène Chevreul, and the American psychologists William James and Ray Hyman have demonstrated that many phenomena attributed to spiritual or paranormal forces, or to mysterious "energies," are actually due to ideomotor action. Furthermore, these tests demonstrate that "honest, intelligent people can unconsciously engage in muscular activity that is consistent with their expectations".[9] They also show that suggestions that can guide behavior can be given by subtle clues (Hyman 1977).
reply about 3 hours
Abbergrl posted in Say Anything:
Exactly. I tend to judge wrongly when I am not in such a good moodand I realize how nfair I am being. The people were actually really nice; they just didn't really know me and so they wouldn't talk I learnt to reat others the way I'd like to be treated. And I still do it sometiems but I'm trying to stop. 
reply about 3 hours
Abbergrl posted in General:
@heyangelhere ANGELLLLLL lol I wanted to wiiiiiin but congratsCan we make another like that? I'd just discovered it and started loving it.
reply about 4 hours
Abbergrl posted in General:
reply about 4 hours
Hey guys! So I enjoy writing stories, and PunMaster gave me the idea to make a forum where I can post my writing! So uh, here it is.
reply about 6 hours