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All About Marshmallows

They’re squishy , they’re fluffy, they’re sweet and easy to eat - but what exactly are they and how did they come to be one of the most popular treats? Still don’t know what we’re talkin’ about? Marshmallows of course! Find out more in All About Marshmallows!

MMM....Marshmallows!

We see them in desserts all the time, chances are you even have some in your cupboard at home, but what exactly are marshmallows? The marshmallows we eat today are made from sugar, water, corn syrup and gelatin that is softened in hot water, and vanilla which are whipped until they reach a sponge- like texture. Sometimes color is added to make them a treat for the eyes as well. Some recipes include eggs as well.

Medicinal Marshmallows

Marshmallows weren’t always confections meant for throwing in hot chocolate and s’mores, the original marshmallow was actually medicinal. In Ancient times there were many medicinal uses for marshmallow root, for example the Ancient Egyptians used to extract sap from marshmallow plant roots and mix it with honey and nuts to soothe sore throats (it didn’t hurt that the chewy substance they made from these ingredients doubled as a sweet treat!)

French Food

In the early 19th century French candy-makers came up with the idea of sweetening and whipping marshmallow sap to create a fluffy confection. This new candywas incredibly popular but labor-intensive to create and French sweet shop owners couldn’t keep up with demand. By the end of the 19th century they came up with the idea of adding gelatin, egg whites or corn starch to made the candy chewier and easier to make. It wasn’t until 1948 that there was another major leap forward in marshmallow production when American Alex Doumak invented an extrusion process which was a way to make marshmallows by machine in small cylinders – exactly like the marshmallows we eat today!

Have Your Say

What’s your favorite way to eat marshmallows? Let us know in the comments section below.

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readers voted!

Comments

SelenaGomezFanGirl
i like marshmallows when you must them over the fire!Ooooo!talk about a nice camp out t...
commented: Wed Apr 30, 2014

american_brit

american_brit wrote:

Marshmallows! Mmm... Have any of you ever played Chubby Bunny? It's a fun, but slighty ...
commented: Sun Apr 20, 2014

BookwormKat

BookwormKat wrote:

I will eat a marshmallow anytime of day! I don't care how you give it to me ether! :D
commented: Tue Apr 15, 2014

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AlphaT
AlphaT posted in Debating:
"Teh_Skittlez" wrote: "AlphaT" wrote: "Teh_Skittlez" wrote: I should have known using the confederacy as an example would resonate with you. Like you said, it's another topic, but I could also talk about the Pacific slave trade.  I'm not pro slave, but I am against the south=racist bandwagon. I know you're smart enough to not be on that wagon though. Objection: Relevance? How is Pacific Slave Trade significant to the topic? It affected men and women alike (albeit mostly men)? It's not particularly relevant, it's another topic, that's why I'm not going to talk about it.  Oh. Okay.
reply 6 minutes
Teh_Skittlez
Teh_Skittlez posted in Debating:
"AlphaT" wrote: "Teh_Skittlez" wrote: I should have known using the confederacy as an example would resonate with you. Like you said, it's another topic, but I could also talk about the Pacific slave trade.  I'm not pro slave, but I am against the south=racist bandwagon. I know you're smart enough to not be on that wagon though. Objection: Relevance? How is Pacific Slave Trade significant to the topic? It affected men and women alike (albeit mostly men)? It's not particularly relevant, it's another topic, that's why I'm not going to talk about it. 
reply 7 minutes
AlphaT
AlphaT posted in Debating:
"Teh_Skittlez" wrote:I should have known using the confederacy as an example would resonate with you. Like you said, it's another topic, but I could also talk about the Pacific slave trade.  I'm not pro slave, but I am against the south=racist bandwagon. I know you're smart enough to not be on that wagon though. Objection: Relevance? How is Pacific Slave Trade significant to the topic?
reply 12 minutes
Teh_Skittlez
Teh_Skittlez posted in Debating:
"AlphaT" wrote: "Teh_Skittlez" wrote: "AlphaT" wrote: "Teh_Skittlez" wrote: "AlphaT" wrote: "Teh_Skittlez" wrote: Right, I'm obligated to sign up for the draft, and you couldn't even if you wanted to. Then again, women couldn't own and manage land while married until 1718....and it wasn't national until around 1850. You should probably specify where, because the place where I live wasn't even colonized yet in 1718.  Providence of Pennsylvania. However most states didn't accept it until around 1840-50. Maryland had achieved statehood in 1788, but it took them until 1841 to legalize married women to own property, and even them they had no control over the property. This is the case for many states. Face it, early America treated women as property....she was right on that part. But that's all changed. I'm not denying it. I was merely suggesting that you should specify where. Of course, in all the dates you've listed so far, men were also to be bought and sold as property in the U.S. in the states that would become the Confederacy. I would say that their treatment as property was much harsher than that of women in many cases, but yes, of course both men and women have been treated as property by the law in the past, and still are in many places today.    American Slavery didn't discriminate between genders. And for women, it was the same for blacks and whites. Also, pinning slavery and the confederacy together? I thought you knew more about the topic. But that's another debate. I should have known using the confederacy as an example would resonate with you. Like you said, it's another topic, but I could also talk about the Pacific slave trade. 
reply 17 minutes
Ghostling
Ghostling posted in Food:
Vegetables=Potatoes. Potatoes=Chips (crisps). Chips=Good.
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