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Travel - The Republic of Iraq

No matter where you live, you've been hearing things about Iraq. But how much do you actually know about this middle-eastern country? Find out a little more about the history, the geography and why the United Nations has placed sanctions on trade with Iraq.

History of Iraq

The area which the country of Iraq occupies today was once known by a different name. About 6,000 years ago, this area was known as Mesopotamia - home to the Hanging Gardens of Babylon. In 1932, the country of Iraq joined the British League of Nations and twenty-six years later, in 1958, Iraq became a republic. This means they no longer had a king but an elected president, instead. Iraq's president, Saddam Hussein, who had been leader of the country since 1979, was removed from power in early 2003 when the United States invaded.

Religion in Iraq

Thousands of years after the fall of the Babylonian Empire, in the mid-seventh century, Iraq was invaded by surrounding Arab nations. It was at this time that the country was introduced to the Islam faith. Today, 97 percent of the Iraqi population are Muslim - 60 percent are Shiite Muslims, while approximately 37 percent are Sunni Muslims. The world's Muslim population is continually growing with just under 1.5 billion followers around the globe.

Where Is Iraq?

Iraq lies just off the top, right-hand corner of Africa. It is near several bodies of water, including the Persian Gulf. Iraq borders five separate countries - Kuwait, Iran, Syria, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey. Two major rivers also run through Iraq - the Euphrates and the Tigris.

  • To find out why the United Nations has placed sanctions on Iraq, click here.
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What Is The Capital Of Iraq?

  • Basrah.
  • Baghdad.
  • Kabul.
  • Istanbul.

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CaptJolee
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Roblox <3
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Jolly-Rancher206
It depends. Some religions are incredibly syncretic like Buddhism/ other Eastern religions and don't have a concept of "one true religion or doctrine", so they do lend themselves to being blended. Others claim to be the only truth (Christianity, Islam) so those wouldn't allow combination.  A lot of religions are actually a mix of multiple traditions. Sikhism, Baha'i, Gnosticism to name a few. 
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"simran88" wrote:Which country's schooling system are you talking about? Because different countries' schooling systems need to be different as each country is different and has different needs like Finland's schooling system and Korea's schooling system are very different but both the systems are considered to be excellent.    I personally think that more than schools it depends on the teachers. For example, in India, CCE was introduced to make studies more practical and applicable but because many teachers did not understand the system properly it only ended up becoming a pain for us and the level of our studies dropped making parents think that the system was not good.  I completely agree. More than curriculum (although important), it's teachers that make the difference in the quality of a school system. Yes, education will be different from country to country, but I think at bottom everyone wants kids learning the basics as well as info relevant to when they enter the workforce.  What do we consider excellent? Korea may have good science and math scores, but do their students have creative thinking skills? Can they problem solve or think critically? We tend to think of "good" schools excelling in rote knowledge, but is that all that matters? I'd say no.
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To be fair, aren't most American high schoolers are required to take economic senior year or somewhere around there, where they should be teaching you about personal finance? That was my experience. My school also offers a financial literacy course, but I do think should be mandatory. But yeah, issues in education is a tired refrain, but I don't see widespread improvement. I think about changing the way we do teaching itself. I don't think teachers are paid enough or are given enough freedom with curriculum. It's no longer seen as a respectable job, and you have people that really don't care. When someone's underpaid and told their standardized test scores will make or break them, don't expect the quality of instruction to be stellar. Don't expect an intellectually stimulating environment that fosters creativity or critical thinking. There's no time for that with a bajillion state tests to pass. It's one of the most important professions a person can have imo; it's a shame. 
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