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The Giant-Slayer Book Review

The Giant-Slayer Book Review - Reviewed by Kidzworld on Dec 22, 2009
( Rating: 4 Star Rating)

When Laurie’s best friend contacts Polio, she tells him and his sick friends at the hospital a story of bravery and hope. Kidzworld reviews The Giant-Slayer by Iain Lawrence.

The Giant-Slayer Rating: 4


Author: Iain Lawrence

In 1950, the Polio epidemic was on the rise. Laurie Valentine’s father and nanny lived in constant fear that Laurie would contract the degenerating disease. They made her fear Spring—the beautiful flowers only meant the start of Polio season. She had next to no freedom. She couldn’t share lunches, drink from the fountain or use a public toilet. She couldn’t go to the movies, the bowling alley, the swimming pool or the playground, or anywhere else that children gathered.


The Iron Lung

In the summer of 1955, Laurie’s best and only friend Dickie contracted the horrible disease. He was reduced to an iron lung, permanently hospitalized. Laurie’s father refused to let her visit him, but Laurie wasn’t going to let that stop her. She began making weekly trips to the hospital where she found Dickie and two other children in iron lungs.


Jimmy and the Giant

Her visits became the most anticipated source of entertainment for the sick children when she began telling them an ongoing story of a fierce giant and a small boy named Jimmy who was destined to become a giant slayer. Each week, Laurie continued her tale of Jimmy’s adventures from his birth, to his curse, to his adventurous and dangerous journey in search of his missing mother.


The Bottom Line

The Giant-Slayer by Iain Lawrence is a brave story that illuminates the struggles and hope of a potentially fatal disease. Laurie's story is filled with symbolism, with nearly every character reflecting one of the sick children in the hospital. The book shows how even the smallest and weakest of people can overcome some of life’s giant obstacles.


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    General In The Forums

    AnnaOfExquizurd
    "Mermaid_Author14" wrote: @AnnaOfExquizurd  Your post really was helpful!   I didn't do exactly what you suggested, but I did end up bursting with brain popcorn! (Which, sadly, I can't eat...) I somehow thought of horses/unicorns/pegasi, Max and Harvey, a mermaid, and something else I don't remember...   But thank you for the advice! Alrighty XD You're welcome :P (Yeah, it  is  too bad you can't eat it.)
    reply about 1 hour
    Mermaid_Author14
    @AnnaOfExquizurd  Your post really was helpful! I didn't do exactly what you suggested, but I did end up bursting with brain popcorn! (Which, sadly, I can't eat...) I somehow thought of horses/unicorns/pegasi, Max and Harvey, a mermaid, and something else I don't remember... But thank you for the advice!
    reply about 2 hours
    toripizza
    since i was young since i was small, stupid, clueless. in a daze in a faze that the world was a beautiful kind place. convinced life was a big and precious thing. i was sought after by pigs. no not the animals. although the male species can act like animals. they can be ferocious, sex###########d cold-hearted. They can go after you as if you were prey. hunt you down. and kill you. but instead of taking your life. it's your innocence. your right to feel important in life. they make the word "beautiful", sound so fake the way it slides off their lips and into my mouth convincing me it must be ok if i let my guard down i don't enjoy being talked to because you like the way i look i like the way that butterfly looks but i'm not going to catch it and rip it's wings off. you like my face you like my body but you don't like ME enough to stay and treat me like i'm worth something. exscuse me. while i walk away from your filthy hands. but don't touch me. one more crack in my porceline skin. and i'm done. go break someone elses body.  
    reply about 4 hours
    LittleShadowBird
    "AnnaOfExquizurd" wrote:   Now a question for the Flower Crown Crew: What's your opinion on the human population? Humans are nice! Except probably Donald Trump. He gives me the willies. (shudder) What are humans? Closest I've heard of are Hylians. And they can be pretty cool.
    reply about 4 hours
    AnnaOfExquizurd
    When I try to come up with ideas, I tend to take a cliche and change elements about it so that it takes on a sort of originality. So, for example, let's say we're taking the cliche of a band of friends (or strangers) hunting a dragon. Instead of their motive being that the dragon is, say, eating innocent villagers or holding a princess captive, that it's a more personal issue. Maybe the dragon is a smaller type with a more mischievous demeanor, and is stealing the characters' valuables as a prank, and the characters want their things back. They might be innocent villagers themselves, unskilled with any sort of tracking or fighting techniques, and hire a sort of mercenary to help them out. But if you wanted a plotless sort of thing with a lot of flexibility, you could have the characters be a band of mercenaries who get hired by people to do various jobs. And if you can find more things to swap out in any idea you come up with, you'll eventually find yourself being in a sort of popcorn machine of ideas. Hopefully, this post has been helpful.
    reply about 6 hours