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Suite Scarlett Book Review

Suite Scarlett Book Review - Reviewed by Kidzworld on Sep 30, 2008
( Rating: 3 Star Rating)

Growing up in New York City is anything but ordinary—especially when you live in a hotel! But life sometimes isn’t so sweet for Suite Scarlett. Kidzworld calls up room service and orders this brand new book.

Author: Maureen Johnson

Growing up in New York City is anything but ordinary—especially when you live in a hotel! But life sometimes isn’t so sweet for Suite Scarlett. Kidzworld calls up room service and orders this brand new book.

The Suite Life

Scarlett Martin’s family owns the Hopewell Hotel in New York. It’s old and falling apart, but it once used to be something really great. Right now, Scarlett feels the same way about her family—they’ve had to fire the hotel chef because business is so bad, and that also means that Scarlett’s desire for a fun summer has been cut short. Her parents have asked her to work at the hotel, and, since she’s just turned fifteen, she’s now in charge of her own suite (just like her older brother and sister). Looks like summer’s not going to be so fun, after all.


The Actress Arrives

Right when Scarlett starts to think her summer’s going to be super boring, in walks Mrs. Amberson, a former actress with a huge personality. And guess what? She’s staying in the Empire Suite, the one Scarlett is in charge of. All of a sudden Scarlett’s summer starts looking up, especially when Mrs. Amberson hires Scarlett to be her assistant and to help her write a book about her crazy life! At the same time, Scarlett’s brother Spencer, a wannabe actor, has started a new play, and his costar is a super hot guy, Eric. Now Scarlett is smitten, and charged with helping her brother keep the play a secret from their parents—who want Spencer to give up acting and go to culinary school!


The Show Must Go On!

Right when everything seems perfect, it all starts to unravel—Mrs. Amberson’s life, Scarlett’s love life, her family’s way of making a living, Spencer and Eric’s play—Scarlett’s unexpected, exciting summer starts to turn ugly. But with everything that she’s learned and experienced, will she be able to pull it all back together again?


The Final Chapter

Scarlett’s unconventional family life is a great setting for a book like this. The characters are interesting and easy to relate to, even the ones who are a little nutty (like Mrs. Amberson). One of the only drawbacks of Suite Scarlett is that the character we’re supposed to care about most—Scarlett—is the one we end up knowing the least! It’s hard to understand her choices or to care about her when she trips up when we know very little about her. If as much time was spent on her as on the people all around her, then Suite Scarlett would be a great read. As it is, it’s only a good one.


Rating:3


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