-
x

Meet New Friends!

Recommended friends are based on your interests. Make sure they are up to date.

Friends
Kidzworld Logo

Book Review: Stormbringers (Order of Darkness, #2) by Philippa Gregory

Book Review: Stormbringers (Order of Darkness, #2) by Philippa Gregory - Reviewed by Kidzworld on Jul 22, 2013
( Rating: 4 Star Rating)

As Luca searches for signs that the world is ending, his inquiries are interrupted by a children's crusade led by a boy who preaches God's will. Kidzworld has the book review of Stormbringers (Order of Darkness #2) by Philippa Gregory.

The Inquirer

Luca and his four traveling companions - his servant Frieze, Brother Peter, Lady Isolde and her childhood friend Ishraq - continue their journey from Rome to Pescara, Italy, where Luca hopes to catch a ship to Croatia. It's Luca's job to make inquiries which are assigned to him by the leader of the holy Order of Darkness. He believes the world is ending, and Luca must look for the signs.

The Crusade

On his latest inquiry, Luca and his friends encounter a children's crusade, led by Johann, a young teen who claims that God speaks directly to him. At first, Luca and his companions are skeptical. Johann is either a saint or a devil. But when he reveals secrets from both Luca and Isolde's pasts - secrets he couldn't possibly know unless he was granted divine wisdom - the inquirer dubs him a saint. Luca's group joins the crusade and they head to the ocean, where Johann believes the water will part for them so they can walk dry-shod to Jerusalem. Skeptical again, Luca arranges for ships to take them across the water. But the ships prove unnecessary when they arrive on the shore. The water peels back and creates a path into the ocean's depths. 

The Tidal Wave

Most of the children follow close behind Johann as he guides them into the sea, but Frieze remains uncertain. He's convinced that the water will return just as quickly as it receded. He urges his friends to seek safety before returning to the shore to save the horses. And that's when the fearsome water strikes - a tidal wave that rips through the small ocean side village, destroying homes and washing hundreds, if not thousands, out to sea, including Frieze.

The Accused

With Johann gone, the survivors need someone to blame. They accuse Isolde and Ishraq of being the devil's aids, summoning the wave but sparing their own lives. But Ishraq, an educated woman, suspects something else is at work - something neither divine nor evil. Will anyone believe the words of an educated slave when she claims that the wave was caused by an earthquake? And how will Luca cope with the loss of his best friend?

The Bottom Line

Continuing where book 1 left off, The Stormbringers is a great tale of the 15th century by bestselling historical fiction author Philippa Gregory. As the characters develop, unexpected connections emerge. If you're interested in reading books set in the past, or religious fiction, Kidzworld recommends the Order of Darkness series.

Order of Darkness #2: The Stormbringers Rating: 4

Have Your Say

The Stormbringers' topic is religion and the end of the world. What's your favorite book topic? Tell us in our comment section below!

 

20 Comments

Related Stories

Micro_bookreview-theseaofmonsters-micro
Percy and Annabeth set out on a quest to rescue Grover and save Camp Half-Blood. Kidzworld has th...
Micro_bookreview-requiem-micro
In Requiem, book 3 in the bestselling Delirium trilogy by Lauren Oliver, the final showdown betwe...
Micro_fleshandbone-micro
On their journey through the Rot and Ruin, Benny and his friends encounter villains worse than zo...
Micro_thediviners-micro
Best known for her Great and Terrible Beauty trilogy, Libba Bray returns with a spooky teen novel...
Religion-poll

Are You Religious? Vote!

  • Yeah. I have very specific religious beliefs.
  • Sort of but I'm not too serious about it.
  • I believe in something but I'm not sure what.
  • I am not religious.

Random In The Forums

-Gwen9--
-Gwen9-- posted in New Users:
I commented Jordan about it. I found it a great idea. 
reply 9 minutes
Black_Rose_19
Black_Rose_19 posted in Debating:
Haha, I guess after looking at your facts, you win. I still am pretty bad at this, so I'm quick to give up, but you've actually successfully changed my opinion on this, so props to you. Well, that's what I get for messing with the master.
reply 10 minutes
naruto200
naruto200 posted in New Users:
Yeah, i'm not blaming you for that. Just, they might find it annoying. But kw should make a tutorial video for kw though. That would be so appreciated by new users.
reply 19 minutes
-Gwen9--
-Gwen9-- posted in New Users:
I don't mean for it to be spread out into posts, but there is a character limit. 
reply 26 minutes
AlphaT
AlphaT posted in Debating:
"Black_Rose_19" wrote:I originally got this story from a source that most people wouldn't exactly call credible , a comedy/politics TV show, but after checking their sources, I believe I have a strong case with decently strong sources.  I hope so. I'm using the same source that John used for debate's sake.  "Black_Rose_19" wrote:You are incorrect when you said you'd only have to pay for labor and materials, as several other factors come into play. Factors...such as? "Black_Rose_19" wrote: Also, where I said 1000 feet, I very much apologize, more like 1000 miles. It should cost about 10 billion for the concrete panels, and although concrete is cheap, it's not dirt cheap, and 1000 miles of concrete will add up to a pretty good amount.  It's okay, I adjusted ## ####### to miles, but somehow still said feet. The same estimate I gave is found in the article, which is around eight million cubic yards of concrete. This would total out to roughly thirty two billion pounds of concrete, which totals out to 533 million bags of concrete, each weighing sixty pounds. The average cost of a sixty pound bag of concrete is $2.83, which we them multiply by 533 million to get 1.5 billion.  This is where I messed up. I used the standard price of unmixed concrete, when I needed to use the standard price of precast slabs. Oliver's source does the rest:  "A cement manufacturer said prices are now running $85 to $90 a cubic yard, so that works out to about $700 million just for the concrete" However, in an update, they nixed the math all together and went with an anonymous economist's unevidenced estimate:  "He worked through some of the math, though he did not want to be identified publicly. Roughly, he said a wall of this type would cost at least $25 billion" This is what John Oliver used on his show. As the unknown economist cites no reason for us to think that the cost would be anywhere near his estimate, I see no reason to think his estimate is valid.  So, effectively, we've reduced the cost from 3 billion to 700 million. Let's the keep the billion dollar safe fund though. Total so far: 1.7 Billion "Black_Rose_19" wrote:Next it should cost 5-6 billion dollars for steel columns to hold the panels, including labor. Really? Including labor? Fine with me. I'm honestly not sure how much steel would be needed for each panel, so I'll defer to this estimate.  Total Cost so far: 6.7 Billion "Black_Rose_19" wrote:Add another billion for concrete footing and foundations, and that's sixteen billion dollars. The Washington Post article included foundation in their total assessment of the concrete required. "Black_Rose_19" wrote:But, transport is required to inaccessible areas. It will cost about another 2 billion dollars to build roads that will allow 20 ton trucks to carry materials to the wall. At ten million dollars per mile, a road spanning the entire length of the wall would require ten billion dollars. Why do you think a fifth of this cost would be required?  The average cost of a road which would allow such transport is 5 million per mile. Let's overestimate the length that would be required to two hundred miles. That gets you to 1 billion.  Total cost so far: 7.7 Billion "Black_Rose_19" wrote:We also need engineering, design, and management, which brings us up to the magic number of 25 billion dollars, on average considering all factors. The Congressional Budget office also says that wall management costs will exceed the original cost to build the wall in as little as seven years. From your previous estimate of eighteen billion, I'll assume that you're factoring in seven billion dollars worth of engineering, design, and management? Why do you think it'll cost that much? To pay every engineer, designer, and manager who would ever work on the wall...I'd put aside about 1.5 billion. Total cost: 9.2 Billion Well what do you know. About a sixth of the annual trade deficit with Mexico, and almost a third of your original estimate.  "Black_Rose_19" wrote:With the Mexico paying for it part, as John Oliver, the host of this show, says, "People don't exactly love it when you make them pay for [expletive] they don't want." The current Mexican treasury secretary states, "Mexico, under no circumstance, is going to pay for the wall that Mr. Trump is proposing." 2 former Mexican presidents that only recently left office also say, in a nutshell, that Mexico will never pay for the wall.  They won't love it, but they will pay for it. If they refuse, Trump plans to put a 35% tariff on all Mexican import. In other words, every company in Mexico will have to pay 35% the value of whatever they're bringing into The United States. Mexico will lose more money paying this tariff than they would by financing the wall, so either way the United States gets the money it needs to build the wall from Mexico. 
reply 39 minutes