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Shadowed Summer Book Review

Shadowed Summer Book Review - Reviewed by Kidzworld on Apr 07, 2009
( Rating: 4 Star Rating)

Iris encounters the spirit of a young man who mysteriously disappeared many years ago. It’s up to her to uncover how he died. Check out Saundra Mitchell’s teen thriller, Shadowed Summer.

Author: Saundra Mitchell

In the small town of Ondine, Louisiana, there’s not much to do in the summer. That’s why fourteen year old Iris and her best friend Collette always make up stories and magic spells. But this summer Iris faces more activity than she bargained for…ghostly activity, that is.


A Closed Case

Iris, Collette and Collette’s new boyfriend, Ben, search the cemetery for clues to Elijah Laundry’s mysterious death. The only trouble is, he disappeared many, many years ago, before Iris was even born. And no one they ask will talk about the case—not the sheriff, not Elijah’s mother and especially not Iris’s father.


Dark Magic

Iris and her friends aren’t ready to give up on the investigation. They use a Ouija board and hold a séance without knowing the consequences of evoking spirits. Soon Elijah’s mischievous spirit won’t leave Iris alone. He puts piles of rocks on her bed, writes in her spell book and leaves messages on her bathroom mirror . Iris is spooked, but she knows that Elijah is trying to show her how he died.


A Father’s Secret

When Iris won’t drop the case, her father becomes furious. He enrolls her in counseling, assuming that her so called “spiritual encounters” are the first signs of mental illness. Iris discovers that her father and Elijah used to be best friends. Yet he refuses to talk about his disappearance. Is the memory to painful, or is her father trying to hide something?


The Bottom Line

Shadowed Summer is a fairly good story, complete with a few satisfying twists. Teens may not enjoy the references to playing make believe, but they’ll relate to the characters’ jealous and boy crazy behaviors. This book is certainly not the best teen thriller out there, but it’s great for those who love reading about ghosts. If you want to read more books about ghosts, check out Meg Cabot ’s Mediator series.


Shadowed Summer Rating: 4


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  • The Ghosts of Rathburn Park Book Review
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