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Quiz the Coach - I Have Asthma

Quiz the Coach - I Have Asthma - Reviewed by Kidzworld on Dec 27, 2006
( Rating: 1 Star Rating)

Quiz the coach helps teens and tweens with sports and fitness related issues and problems like obesity, asthma, healthy eating questions, skateboard tricks and P.E. dilemnas.

So ya dig sports but need some help with your game? Don't understand some of the rules of football, basketball or hockey? Got a gripe about P.E. class, skateboarders, cheerleading, coaches, or anything? Why not ?

1Hey Coach,
I really like to run! But there is a problem. My coach doesn't give me all the support I need and my team always runs ahead of me. I have asthma and sometimes it's hard for me to keep up. I feel like I want to quit because I don't feel all the respect I should get being on a team. What should I do? Please HELP!
NYGirl0292

Hey NYGirl0292,
Playing sports and exericising when you have asthma can certainly present some challenges - but they're not so great that they can't be overcome. More intense activities like long distance running tend to me more strenuous on athletes with asthma, so you'll need to slowly build up your fitness level. Don't expect your teammates to slow down their pace, just so you "feel respected". Being on a running team doesn't mean that everyone runs at the same pace. Everyone needs to push each other and help their teammates do as well as they can. Talk to your coach and teammates about your asthma and let them know some of the challengs you're having. Having asthma means you'll have to concentrate more on training techniques and monitoring your breathing - but it doesn't mean you'll always be at the back of the pack. As your fitness level improves, your asthma should have less of an impact and you won't be so far behind your teammates.

Here are a few tips that will help you deal with your asthma, while running.

  • Before running, warm up up carefully and slowly. This will lessen the impact of a strenuous run on your lungs.
  • Cross train with other sports like swimming. It's a great activity to improve fitness and strength, and it rarely causes any symptoms of asthma.
  • Bring your inhaler with you while exercising and don't be afraid to take a breather if you feel an asthma attack coming on.
  • For more info and tips on exercising with asthma, click here.

Do you need tips or advice on sports, fitness or health? to the Kidzworld Coach. Keep in mind peeps, the Kidzworld Coach isn't a doctor or a professional athlete or anything like that. He's just a dude who digs sports, plays 'em and knows a lot about 'em. You should always talk to your 'rents, a doctor or your school gym teacher before starting a new sport or a new exercise.

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Sports In The Forums

unicornsrule626
"rainbowpoptart" wrote:I hate to be that person who pulls out the dictionary, buuuuut let's look at the definitions for sport (athleticism wise).competitive physical activity: an individual or group competitive activity involving physical exertion or skill, governed by rules, and sometimes engaged in professionallyDoes cheerleading fit under this definition? Yes.pastime: an active pastime participated in for pleasure or exercise Oh look, cheerleading fits under this definition too.Being a cheerleader requires a certain amount of physical fitness. You need to be strong, flexible, and energetic, which are all things not everyone has.It is a form of exercise and entertainment.It is a sport.Is one variant more challenging than the other? Yes, but that does not devalue anything.Not everyone is going to be able to understand the difficulties cheerleaders go through, and that's perfectly fine. Every sport is dangerous, some are just more obvious than others. When people are good at what they do, they make things seem easy. very well said! I was a cheerleader for 2 years until  I aged out, but let ,e tell you, they were 2 of the best,sweaty and most fun years I have ever had
reply 1 day
rainbowpoptart
I hate to be that person who pulls out the dictionary, buuuuut let's look at the definitions for sport (athleticism wise). competitive physical activity: an individual or group competitive activity involving physical exertion or skill, governed by rules, and sometimes engaged in professionally Does cheerleading fit under this definition? Yes. pastime: an active pastime participated in for pleasure or exercise  Oh look, cheerleading fits under this definition too. Being a cheerleader requires a certain amount of physical fitness. You need to be strong, flexible, and energetic, which are all things not everyone has. It is a form of exercise and entertainment. It is a sport. Is one variant more challenging than the other? Yes, but that does not devalue anything. Not everyone is going to be able to understand the difficulties cheerleaders go through, and that's perfectly fine. Every sport is dangerous, some are just more obvious than others. When people are good at what they do, they make things seem easy.
reply 1 day
angelover4
CHEERLEADING IS LIKE DANCE GYMNASTICS MIXED TOGETHER WITH WORDS. AND DANCE AND GYMNASTICS ARE CONSIDERED SPORTS.
reply 1 day
angelover4
I BELIVE ITS A SPORT JUST LIKE I THINK GYMNASTICS IS A SPORT.
reply 1 day
angelover4
I BEL ITS A SPORT JUS TLIKE I THINK GYMNASTICS IS A SPORT.
reply 1 day