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Los Angeles Summer Attractions

Planning a trip to California this summer? Before you head off on your vacation, take a look at some of the coolest attractions in the Los Angeles Area - it'll save you from reading through all those tourist brochures!

Los Angeles - Disneyland

Happy Birthday Disneyland! Mickey and the rest of his pals have been chillin' in the Magic Kingdom for 50 years and they're throwing one of the biggest parties around! In celebration of their 50th anniversary, Disneyland is re-opening one its coolest attractions - Space Mountain! Travel past shooting stars, planets and much more. There's so much great stuff to see at Disneyland, you'll probably need a couple days to get through it all - they don't call it the happiest place on earth for nothing!

Los Angeles - Knott's Berry Farm

After you're done hanging out with Donald Duck, Goofy and the rest of the Disney characters, why not drop by to see Charlie Brown and his friends? Camp Snoopy is just one part of Knott's Berry Farm - America's very first theme park. Chances are the 'rents have already been to Knott's Berry but they'll definitely be willing to go back with you. There are tons of rides, a water park and there are always great shows to watch throughout the park. The coolest part is that your ticket to Knott's Berry Farm includes an All-You-Can-Eat BBQ!

Los Angeles - Six Flags Magic Mountain

Home to the largest collection of xtreme roller coasters on the planet, Six Flags Magic Mountain is not an amusement park for the faint of heart. There are 16 original roller coasters and more than 100 other rides awaiting the dare devil in you. Don't worry, there's stuff for your younger sibs too like Bugs Bunny World and Daffy's Adventure Tours. Then, when you're teetering on the brink of hurling up all that cotton candy you've been eating all day, take a break from the roller coasters and check out the brand new Batman Begins Stunt Show! Get up-close-and-personal with the special effects used in the blockbuster movie - and check out the one and only Batmobile.

Los Angeles - Universal Studios

There are a couple of new attractions to check out at Universal Studios this year like Revenge of The Mummy: The Ride and Van Helsing: Fortress Dracula. The Mummy features one of the world's fastest indoor roller coasters and Van Helsing lets you explore Dracula's crypt, complete with scary creatures around every corner. While at Universal, be sure to check out some of their more classic attractions like the Jurassic Park ride and Back to the Future: The Ride. It's like being right in the movie!

Los Angeles - Pharaoh's Lost Kingdom

Get ready for a full day of family fun at Pharaoh's Lost Kingdom. You've got the best of everything at Pharaoh's with rides, arcade, laser tag, miniature golf, Go Karts and a giant water park! Be sure to remember your bathing suit cuz there are water slides here that you don't wanna miss. From Ramses' Rocket Speed Slide to the Riptide Surf Pool, you're in for one wet ride!

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Best Attraction at Universal Studios?

  • Revenge of the Mummy: The Ride.
  • Van Helsing: Fortress Dracula.
  • Shrek 4-D.
  • Back to the Future: The Ride.

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-Gwen9--
-Gwen9-- posted in New Users:
I commented Jordan about it. I found it a great idea. 
reply 9 minutes
Black_Rose_19
Black_Rose_19 posted in Debating:
Haha, I guess after looking at your facts, you win. I still am pretty bad at this, so I'm quick to give up, but you've actually successfully changed my opinion on this, so props to you. Well, that's what I get for messing with the master.
reply 10 minutes
naruto200
naruto200 posted in New Users:
Yeah, i'm not blaming you for that. Just, they might find it annoying. But kw should make a tutorial video for kw though. That would be so appreciated by new users.
reply 19 minutes
-Gwen9--
-Gwen9-- posted in New Users:
I don't mean for it to be spread out into posts, but there is a character limit. 
reply 26 minutes
AlphaT
AlphaT posted in Debating:
"Black_Rose_19" wrote:I originally got this story from a source that most people wouldn't exactly call credible , a comedy/politics TV show, but after checking their sources, I believe I have a strong case with decently strong sources.  I hope so. I'm using the same source that John used for debate's sake.  "Black_Rose_19" wrote:You are incorrect when you said you'd only have to pay for labor and materials, as several other factors come into play. Factors...such as? "Black_Rose_19" wrote: Also, where I said 1000 feet, I very much apologize, more like 1000 miles. It should cost about 10 billion for the concrete panels, and although concrete is cheap, it's not dirt cheap, and 1000 miles of concrete will add up to a pretty good amount.  It's okay, I adjusted ## ####### to miles, but somehow still said feet. The same estimate I gave is found in the article, which is around eight million cubic yards of concrete. This would total out to roughly thirty two billion pounds of concrete, which totals out to 533 million bags of concrete, each weighing sixty pounds. The average cost of a sixty pound bag of concrete is $2.83, which we them multiply by 533 million to get 1.5 billion.  This is where I messed up. I used the standard price of unmixed concrete, when I needed to use the standard price of precast slabs. Oliver's source does the rest:  "A cement manufacturer said prices are now running $85 to $90 a cubic yard, so that works out to about $700 million just for the concrete" However, in an update, they nixed the math all together and went with an anonymous economist's unevidenced estimate:  "He worked through some of the math, though he did not want to be identified publicly. Roughly, he said a wall of this type would cost at least $25 billion" This is what John Oliver used on his show. As the unknown economist cites no reason for us to think that the cost would be anywhere near his estimate, I see no reason to think his estimate is valid.  So, effectively, we've reduced the cost from 3 billion to 700 million. Let's the keep the billion dollar safe fund though. Total so far: 1.7 Billion "Black_Rose_19" wrote:Next it should cost 5-6 billion dollars for steel columns to hold the panels, including labor. Really? Including labor? Fine with me. I'm honestly not sure how much steel would be needed for each panel, so I'll defer to this estimate.  Total Cost so far: 6.7 Billion "Black_Rose_19" wrote:Add another billion for concrete footing and foundations, and that's sixteen billion dollars. The Washington Post article included foundation in their total assessment of the concrete required. "Black_Rose_19" wrote:But, transport is required to inaccessible areas. It will cost about another 2 billion dollars to build roads that will allow 20 ton trucks to carry materials to the wall. At ten million dollars per mile, a road spanning the entire length of the wall would require ten billion dollars. Why do you think a fifth of this cost would be required?  The average cost of a road which would allow such transport is 5 million per mile. Let's overestimate the length that would be required to two hundred miles. That gets you to 1 billion.  Total cost so far: 7.7 Billion "Black_Rose_19" wrote:We also need engineering, design, and management, which brings us up to the magic number of 25 billion dollars, on average considering all factors. The Congressional Budget office also says that wall management costs will exceed the original cost to build the wall in as little as seven years. From your previous estimate of eighteen billion, I'll assume that you're factoring in seven billion dollars worth of engineering, design, and management? Why do you think it'll cost that much? To pay every engineer, designer, and manager who would ever work on the wall...I'd put aside about 1.5 billion. Total cost: 9.2 Billion Well what do you know. About a sixth of the annual trade deficit with Mexico, and almost a third of your original estimate.  "Black_Rose_19" wrote:With the Mexico paying for it part, as John Oliver, the host of this show, says, "People don't exactly love it when you make them pay for [expletive] they don't want." The current Mexican treasury secretary states, "Mexico, under no circumstance, is going to pay for the wall that Mr. Trump is proposing." 2 former Mexican presidents that only recently left office also say, in a nutshell, that Mexico will never pay for the wall.  They won't love it, but they will pay for it. If they refuse, Trump plans to put a 35% tariff on all Mexican import. In other words, every company in Mexico will have to pay 35% the value of whatever they're bringing into The United States. Mexico will lose more money paying this tariff than they would by financing the wall, so either way the United States gets the money it needs to build the wall from Mexico. 
reply 39 minutes