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kid & teen book reviews

Schooled Book Review

It’s time to head back to school whether you like it or not so you may as well try to get in the spirit (no one likes a sulker). Here's a great... read more

Genius Squad Book Review

Cadel Piggott is back in Genius Squad, the follow up to Catherine Jinks’ successful novel, Evil Genius.... read more

Cathy's Book Book Review

Cathy Vickers is determined to find out why her boyfriend dumped her and then disappeared off the face of the earth. Check out what this... read more

Julian Rodriguez Book Review

Julian Rodriguez is not your average eight-year-old. For starters he is a First Officer of the Federation on a secret assignment to eart... read more

The Seventh Tower Series Book Review

The Seventh Tower fantasy series follows two kids who live in a world left in complete darkness after its sun is blocked by a magical Ve... read more

The Pocket Guide to Mischief Book Review

Wanna be the best prankster since Bart Simpson? This book promises to teach you everything you need to know about pulling the perfect pr... read more

The Shell Magicians Book Review

We dug for treasure in Kai Meyer's pirate-packed new novel, The Shell Magicians. Read our book review to see what we found!... read more

A Little Friendly Advice Book Review

Ruby's world is turned upside down when her long-lost dad re-enters her life. Here's our review of Siobhan Vivian's debut novel, A Littl... read more

Nim's Island Book Review

Nim's adventures are so crazy, they've now been turned into a major motion picture. We review the book that started it all!... read more

Blood Brothers Book Review

Clay is a high school student that dreams of being a doctor. His world gets turned upside down when his best friend overdoses. Can Clay ... read more

Click Book Review

When Grandpa Gee dies, he leaves Maggie and Jason gifts that will tell them more about their grandpa and themselves than they can ima... read more

My Body, My Self Book Review

If you've ever wondered why your body does the things it does, but were too embarrassed to ask your parents, this book could be for you.... read more

Lulu Atlantis and the Quest for True Blue Love Book Review

When Lulu gains a new baby brother and is no longer the center of attention at home, she sets off to find her true blue love.... read more

The Spiderwick Chronicles Book Review

The Grace kids discover a world of magic, adventure and danger in the Spiderwick Chronicles. We review their story!... read more

Three Little Words :: Book Review

Ashley Rhodes-Courter spent nine years of her life in foster care, before finding her forever family. Three Little Words tells her story... read more

posts from the Random forums

AlphaT
AlphaT posted in Debating:
"Teh_Skittlez" wrote:We have evidence that consciousness relies on the interactions of the neurons in the nervous system. Whether there is some more ethereal aspect to it, we have not discovered, and cannot reasonably assume that there is. Brain injuries are great evidence that when the physical functions of the brain are damaged, that the 'mind' of that brain also becomes damaged.These things suggest that consciousness ends with brain death, and that we as of yet do not have a mechanism through which we could expect consciousness to survive past the death of the body.This is not an argument that there is no consciousness after brain death (saying life after death is nonsense), just that we no evidence that suggests there is; and that we have definitive evidence that links the physicality of the nervous system and the individual's conscious experience. It would therefore not be reasonable to believe that conscious experience continues after the death of the nervous tissue, at least presently.  While I applaud the attempt, this isn't evidence that there is no experience after brain death.  At most, we can say that we have good evidence that the way in which we experience presently is effected by the brain, and we can prove this simply by knowing that there are none of these same experiences when absent of sufficient brain function.
reply 11 minutes
aehsan30
A Dream Within A Dream Take this kiss upon the brow! And, in parting from you now, Thus much let me avow-- You are not wrong, who deem That my days have been a dream; Yet if hope has flown away In a night, or in a day, In a vision, or in none, Is it therefore the less gone? All that we see or seem Is but a dream within a dream. I stand amid the roar Of a surf-tormented shore, And I hold within my hand Grains of the golden sand-- How few! yet how they creep Through my fingers to the deep, While I weep--while I weep! O God! can I not grasp Them with a tighter clasp? O God! can I not save One from the pitiless wave? Is all that we see or seem But a dream within a dream?
reply 13 minutes
Teh_Skittlez
Teh_Skittlez posted in Debating:
"AlphaT" wrote: "Flitterfrost" wrote: No, I don't believe so. When you're dead, you stay dead. There is nothing. You are gone. End of story. *asks for proof* We have evidence that consciousness relies on the interactions of the neurons in the nervous system. Whether there is some more ethereal aspect to it, we have not discovered, and cannot reasonably assume that there is. Brain injuries are great evidence that when the physical functions of the brain are damaged, that the 'mind' of that brain also becomes damaged. These things suggest that consciousness ends with brain death, and that we as of yet do not have a mechanism through which we could expect consciousness to survive past the death of the body. This is not an argument that there is no consciousness after brain death (saying life after death is nonsense), just that we no evidence that suggests there is; and that we have definitive evidence that links the physicality of the nervous system and the individual's conscious experience. It would therefore not be reasonable to believe that conscious experience continues after the death of the nervous tissue, at least presently. 
reply 25 minutes
AlphaT
AlphaT posted in Debating:
"123lookatme" wrote:Nah, I believe that we only have one life and we should live it, I also feel like after we die, that is it, there is no way of living without  lige. So, then, everything relies on what we truly mean by life. 
reply 33 minutes

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