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Melanie in Manhattan Book Review

Melanie in Manhattan Book Review - Reviewed by Kidzworld on Dec 27, 2006
( Rating: 5 Star Rating)

Read about Melanie Martin's in her hometown - New York City!

Author: Carol Weston

In the fourth installment of her hilarious diaries, Melanie Martin is back with a pen in her hand and a couple of boys on her mind. Read our review for Melanie in Manhattan!

Manhattan Life

Eleven year-old Melanie Martin lives in Manhattan with her little brother Matt the Brat, her mom and dad and their pet mice. The family has just returned from spring break in Spain, where Melanie met Miguel, the son of her mom's ex-boyfriend. Melanie dreams of seeing him again and anxiously awaits his emails.

Drama in the City

Meanwhile, Melanie has also been thinking about Justin, a boy in her class who IM's her and helps her with math. To make her life a little more complicated, there's a new girl in school named Suze (Suze the Ooze) who's been spending a lot of time with Melanie's best friend, Cecily. Not only is Melanie a little jealous of their friendship, Suze is always butting into Melanie's business by asking about Justin and telling people that Miguel is Melanie's Spanish boyfriend!


Miguel Comes to New York

One day, Melanie gets a call from Miguel telling her that he's coming to New York for a visit at the end of the school year! Once Miguel arrives, the Martin family takes him to the Empire State Building, Chinatown, Little Italy, Broadway, Times Square and the opera in Central Park. When Melanie and Miguel finally get a minute alone together, they're interrupted by Suze the Ooze! Will Melanie get the kiss from Miguel that she'd always dreamed of? Will she choose the boy who was there all along? Will Suze go from enemy to friend? You'll have to read and see!


The Bottom Line

If you're a sucker for cute love stories and love New York City, this is the book for you! While dishing out lots of humor, it also touches on topics important to young girls, like crushes, first kisses and friendship. Plus, you're likely to come away with some Spanish language skills as Melanie pronounces each Spanish word in the book!


Melanie in Manhattan Rating: 5


Related Stories:

  • With Love From Spain, Melanie Martin Book Review
  • The Diary of Melanie Martin Book Review
  • Monsoon Summer Book Review
  • Girls in Pants: The Third Summer of the Sisterhood Book Review
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    Fave New York City Landmark?

    • The Statue of Liberty.
    • The Empire State Building.
    • Times Square.
    • Central Park.

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